Tag: Undergraduate



Leonard Adreon, BSBA ’50, is a Korean War veteran, a corpsman who chronicled his experiences in a recently released memoir, Hilltop Doc: A Marine Corpsman Fighting Through the Mud and Blood of the Korean War. The memoir marked the first time in 60 years he had confronted and told the stories of the gruesome experiences he faced in war.

He recently returned to campus for a public conversation about his book, moderated by Olin Dean Mark Taylor.

“I didn’t say a word to anybody,” Adreon told the St. Louis Jewish Light. “A lot of us decided that the smartest thing to do was to go on with our lives and put it behind us. What we experienced and endured was horrendous. It was better forgotten.”

After the war, Adreon returned to St. Louis and spent 36 years as the executive vice president of The Siteman Organization. a real estate management and development company. He was an active advocate for the building and real estate industry throughout his career, serving in advocacy roles around the world and in Washington, DC.

Adreon has also been a leader at a variety of charities focused on child welfare and volunteers as a facilitator for writing classes in Washington University’s Lifelong Learning Institute.

He offered this poem to Dean Taylor in late April as a tribute to fallen US soldiers, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen, and Marines.

Remember Forever

I am alone
among the silent stones
It’s early morning
The sun creeps through
sparsely scattered clouds
chases the night away
A cool gentle breeze
tingles my skin

Row after row
marble stones
on a carpet of green
Each curved at the top
standing proud over the grave
a small religious symbol
above the etched name of one who served
and the dates of a shortened shattered life

I’m here to visit my son
resting quietly with other soldiers
Today is his 40th birthday
If he could talk to me
what would he say
What is the message I should carry home

I sit on the small bench
close my eyes and listen

Dad, you’re here, that’s what counts
When I went away I knew the score
Danger lurked with every step
Most guys made it and came home
Some of us ran out of luck

I tried to do my best
for you and Mom
for Jamie and Helen
I longed to hear your voice
Feel the warm hug of your love

try to remember me Dad
and all who lie beside me
Remember me forever
Remember them forever




Stuart Adam Wolfer, BSBA
Julian Wise, LA '93

Julian Wise, LA ’93

Julian Wise, LA ’93, wrote this tribute to his former WashU roommate Stuart Adam Wolfer, BSBA ’93, an Army reservist killed during a mortar attack in Iraq in 2008.

This spring, I attended the 25th reunion for the Washington University Class of 1993. It was a joyful, fast-paced weekend, filled with alumni parties, volunteer events, and conversation with old friends. It was good to stroll the Brookings campus again.

Yet amid the merriment, I couldn’t help noting an absence in our ranks. The week marked the 10th year since the death of my former roommate, Major Stuart Adam Wolfer, KIA in Iraq in 2008.

Stuart and I lived together from 1990 to 1992, first in a suite at Rutledge Hall and later in an off-campus apartment in the Central West End. He remains an unforgettable figure from my Washington University years.

Stuart and I had little in common. I was a quiet liberal arts student from Cape Cod struggling to choose a major. Stuart bounded into WashU from Coral Springs, Florida, rock-confident in his plans for the future—business school, ROTC; an MBA or law degree after graduation. I marveled at his certainty, not without a trace of jealousy. Could it really be that easy to choose a career path without putting yourself through torturous mental gyrations?

Stuart was physical. He stood tall, worked out regularly, and carried himself with commanding presence. He didn’t just enter a room—he strode in. By junior year, he was maintaining a full course load, working part-time at Eddie Bauer’s at the Galleria Mall, and decamping frequently to Fort Leonard Wood in the Ozarks for ROTC training. I couldn’t figure out where he got the energy.

Lee Wolfer of Eagle, Idaho, the widow of Stuart Adam Wolfer, and ROTC Lt. Col. James Craig, unveil a memorial during the Stuart Wolfer Memorial Event at the North Campus of Washington University on April 18, 2018. Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.

Lee Wolfer of Eagle, Idaho, the widow of Stuart Adam Wolfer,
and ROTC Lt. Col. James Craig, unveil a memorial during the Stuart Wolfer Memorial
Event at the North Campus of Washington University
on April 18, 2018. Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.

Stuart and I weren’t best friends, but we were always cordial with each other. I kept quiet in the apartment, did the dishes and paid the rent on time. With his hectic schedule, that was all he was looking for in a roommate. We would never achieve that sentimental, bosom-buddy rapport associated with college friendships. I was a wallflower, while Stuart’s energy was turned up to 11. By senior year we’d drifted on to other living arrangements. I never saw Stuart after graduation; we exchanged a few brief emails before falling out of touch.

Walking among the current generation of WashU students, it struck me that the people least like us are often the ones we learn the most from. There is comfort and ease in bonding with similar people, yet the greatest growth comes from encountering those whose temperaments, outlooks, and natures contrast with our own.

With the passage of years, I’ve come to understand that, while he was no saint—he could be stubborn as a bull when the spirit moved him—Stuart possessed qualities I have come to value, admire, and even try to emulate. He was loyal to a fault, devoted, hard-working, and relentlessly value-driven.

I suspect his energy came from an awareness that his time at Washington University was brief and he was determined to wrest every drop of experience from it.

Today, I think of Stuart’s three daughters, who were young when he died. I want them to know that their father lived with a spark that’s memorable a quarter century later to those who knew him. I’m certain he loved them with a power beyond words. To them, I say: Your father was a remarkable man and you should be proud of him. Washington University certainly is.

Julian Wise is the owner of Island Images Gallery and Genevieve Press, a small non-fiction publishing company. He lives on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. He can be reached at islandimagesgallery.com and julwise@gmail.com.




Excerpted from a profile in The Record by WashU Senior News Editor Diane Toroian Keaggy.

Senior Class President William “Bill” Feng, BSBA ’18, could not have anticipated the changes this nation, city and campus would undergo in the past four years. But he’s glad to have seen and been a part of it.

“This was the right time to be in a college,” Feng said. “And Washington University was the right place.”

Feng, who will graduate with a degree in economics and strategy from Olin Business School, will address thousands of classmates, faculty and family members Friday, May 18, at Washington University in St. Louis’ 157th Commencement. During his speech, he will encourage fellow graduates to stay engaged in the challenges that face their futures and the world.

“With all of the essays and exams and late nights of studying, it would have been easy to tune out everything else,” Feng said. “But whether it is racial equality or the #MeToo movement, we must confront the big questions and issues of our society and community. Our class has proven that we are brave and innovative.

“My hope is that we don’t stop — that what we have accomplished so far is nothing compared to what we will achieve.”

Read Feng’s full profile on The Source. Pictured above: Class President William Feng, an economics and strategy major at Olin Business School, built bridges during his time as a student here. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/Washington University)




A scene from the 2017 undergraduate recognition ceremony.

Dean Mark Taylor shared the following message with the Olin community before the undergraduate recognition ceremony on May 18, 2018.

The Olin Undergraduate Graduation Recognition Ceremony is special for many reasons. Certainly, we share and take great pride in the triumph of our exuberant graduates—now prepared and eager to step from the graduation stage into a new phase of their lives.

The ceremony is also special because it recognizes and celebrates a small number of outstanding faculty and students whose contributions truly helped define the Olin journey for this class. I am delighted and honoured to share with you this year’s 2018 Undergraduate Honors and Awards.

Seunghan Bae: Arthur M. Seltzer Accounting Award. Awarded to recognize an outstanding senior in the area of accounting. Established by Richard Wise, JD ’83, to honor his mentor, Arthur M. Seltzer, BSBA ’62, a successful accountant and financial adviser in St. Louis.

Ross Jordan Brown: Outstanding Student Athlete Award. Awarded to a graduate who exhibits strong leadership ability and sportsmanlike conduct.

Joshua Samuel Cohen: The CEL’s Taylor Outstanding Service Award. Awarded to the graduate or graduates who delivered the highest level of impact to the St. Louis local nonprofit community through the Center for Experiential Learning’s Taylor Community Consulting program. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that resulted in demonstrated advancement of the missions and objectives of the organizations and communities with which they engaged.

Stacy Linn Curnow: Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. Awarded to the graduate with the highest academic average. The award is given by Delta Sigma Pi, America’s foremost professional fraternity for men and women pursuing careers in business.

Hana Elizabeth Davisson: Joseph W. Towle Prize. Awarded to the graduate with the strongest academic achievement and the most potential in the area of organizational leadership. This award is named in honor of Joseph W. Towle, who was a tenured Olin management professor from 1954 to 1975 and a leader among faculty. Well known in his field, an author, and president of the Academy of Management, he established this prize to encourage excellence in the classroom.

Carolina Sarturi Feijo: Powell Niland Prize. Awarded to the graduate with the strongest academic achievement in the areas of operations and manufacturing management. This award is named in honor of Powell Niland, who was a tenured Olin operations and manufacturing management professor from 1957 to 1989 and an Olin professor emeritus from 1989 until 2009.

Zhuoqun Weber Gaowen: The CEL’s Taylor Outstanding Service Award. Awarded to the graduate or graduates who delivered the highest level of impact to the St. Louis local nonprofit community through the Center for Experiential Learning’s Taylor Community Consulting program. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that resulted in demonstrated advancement of the missions and objectives of the organizations and communities with which they engaged.

Garris Wayne Goe: Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. Awarded to the graduate with the highest academic average. The award is given by Delta Sigma Pi, America’s foremost professional fraternity for men and women pursuing careers in business.

Eric Andrew MagliarditiJohn W. Bowyer Award in Finance. Awarded to the graduate who is considered to have the greatest potential for success in a career in finance, as judged by the finance faculty. The award is named in honor of the late John W. Bowyer, who was a legendary teacher of finance at Olin from 1951 to 1987.

Jacqueline Elise Oestreicher: Kay Roh Memorial Award. Awarded to a graduate in recognition of his or her contributions to Washington University and/or the St. Louis community through extracurricular or volunteer activities, as judged by his or her classmates. Named to honor Kay Roh, who was awarded her BSBA posthumously in 1991. The award is made possible through the generosity of her parents, Min and Jae Roh, and grandparents Ginger and Jack Woods.

Joshua Eric Rotker: Undergraduate Marketing Award. Awarded by the faculty to a graduate for outstanding achievement in the field of marketing.

Joshua Ben Schuftan: Center for Experiential Learning Impact Award. Recognizes the graduate who has delivered the highest level of impact to the business and nonprofit communities through The Center for Experiential Learning (CEL) and other Olin-sponsored experiential programs, as judged by the CEL Leadership team/Graduate Fellows supporting them. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that advanced the missions and objectives of the organizations and individuals with whom they engaged across the globe.

Brandon Keay Guan See: Powell Niland Prize. Awarded to the graduate with the strongest academic achievement in the areas of operations and manufacturing management. This award is named in honor of Powell Niland, who was a tenured Olin operations and manufacturing management professor from 1957 to 1989 and an Olin professor emeritus from 1989 until 2009.

Adam Gideon Taitz: International Business Student Award. Awarded to the graduate who shows the greatest potential for a career in international business. Loeb Prize in Leadership. Awarded to a graduate who has shown leadership in undergraduate activities related to Olin Business School and who maintains excellence in scholastic achievement, as judged by his or her classmates. This award is named in honor of Isidor Loeb, who was dean of Washington University’s School of Business and Public Administration (now known as Olin Business School) from 1925 to 1940.

Cole Rashad West: Dean’s Special Service Award. Awarded by the dean to recognize students who have rendered extraordinary service to Olin.

Ellen Siyi Wu: The CEL’s Taylor Outstanding Service Award. Awarded to the graduate or graduates who delivered the highest level of impact to the St. Louis local nonprofit community through the Center for Experiential Learning’s Taylor Community Consulting program. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that resulted in demonstrated advancement of the missions and objectives of the organizations and communities with which they engaged.

Summa Cum Laude: Awarded to the top 5 percent of the undergraduate Class of 2018 as established by the end of their final semester.

  • Seunghan Bae
  • Stacy Linn Curnow
  • Jared Ryan Dauman
  • Peter Good Dissinger
  • Garris Wayne Goe
  • Jacob Mason Klein
  • Eric Andrew Magliarditi
  • Chloe Naguib
  • Marisa Lynn Parnes
  • Joshua Eric Rotker
  • Maximilian Sassouni
  • Joshua Ben Schuftan
  • Brandon Keay Guan See
  • Jamie Alexandra Semler

Magna Cum Laude: Awarded to the top 6 to 15 percent of the undergraduate Class of 2018 as established by the end of their final semester.

  • Joshua Ryan Bircoll
  • Tess Eliza Citron
  • Jameson Engel Cook
  • Andrew Harrison Eichen
  • Carolina Sarturi Feijo
  • Monica Elaine Hellmer
  • Emily Nicole Holtzclaw
  • Jessica Huang
  • Yong Suk Kim
  • Devin Janette Kuokka
  • Jessica Bingqi Lin
  • Andy Z. Liu
  • Yuchen Liu
  • Jiangnan Meng
  • Deepika Nagarajan
  • Arya Vishnu Narasimhan
  • Timothy Insun Park
  • Adam Joel Regent
  • Emily Marie Romanow
  • Dani Scherl
  • Ethan Bruce Schueler
  • Jingyi Tan
  • Siddharth Vanamamalai
  • Kiersten Elizabeth West
  • Daniel Won
  • Ellen Siyi Wu
  • John D. Wu
  • Zhou Yu

Honors in Management: Awarded to graduating seniors who have completed the honors program.

Hana Elizabeth Davisson: “So You Think You Can Negotiate? The Effect of Individual Differences on Initiating and Conducting Negotiations”

Zhuoqun Weber Gaowen: “Follow the Money – Analyzing Montgomery County Crime Statistics Based on Income, Race and Age at the Census Tract Level”

Ji Hyun Hur: “Follow the Money – Analyzing Montgomery County Crime Statistics Based on Income, Race and Age at the Census Tract Level”

Patrick Thomas Koenig: “The Economic Impact of Policy Incentives in Eliminating Bad Habits: Mandatory Drug Testing for TANF Recipients”

Benjamin Irwin Kugelman: “So You Think You Can Negotiate? The Effect of Individual Differences on Initiating and Conducting Negotiations”

Kiran Maria Kuttickat: “Females in CEO Positions: The Impact of Gender on Company Performance and Market View”

Ethan Bruce Schueler: “The Economic Impact of Policy Incentives in Eliminating Bad Habits: Mandatory Drug Testing for TANF Recipients”

Emma Mae Turnbull: “So You Think You Can Negotiate? The Effect of Individual Differences on Initiating and Conducting Negotiations”

Harry Jack Varon: “Females in CEO Positions: The Impact of Gender on Company Performance and Market View”

Pictured above: A scene from the 2017 undergraduate recognition ceremony.




Riana Nigam, BSBA ’19, wrote this for the Olin Blog. She was the recipient of an award to study abroad from the Glazer Global Learning Fund. 

It is the last day of my study abroad program, so naturally it feels like an appropriate time to do some reflecting. Over the course of the last four months, I feel like I have accomplished so much.

I have lived alone in a foreign country, I have organized trips and navigated new cities, I have learned about other cultures, I have taken interesting courses at a reputable business school in Europe, I have tried new foods, I have discovered things about myself, and the list goes on.

One of my most memorable experiences abroad pertains to a group project that I participated in as part of my operations management course at ESCP Europe, the French business school.

The project entailed selecting any business in Paris, visiting the sight, conducting an interview with the manager and analyzing and evaluating different dimensions of the business’s operations in a research paper.

My group consisted of three American undergraduate students and two Italian master’s students, so it was both a wonderful growth opportunity and immense challenge to recognize similarities and reconcile the differences in our cultural backgrounds and experience levels.

For our business, we selected an Italian restaurant called Marzo, located in Saint-Germain, a more upscale area in Paris.

I particularly enjoyed visiting the site during off-hours and gaining interesting first-hand insights from the restaurant’s manager regarding supply chain management, menu construction, consumer perception and several other topics.

It was not only a unique experience to be able to understand one aspect of the business environment in another country, but it was also greatly rewarding to present our final conclusions and recommendations to the restaurant itself.

After receiving welcoming feedback from both our professor and the restaurant, my group and I felt that we had achieved something meaningful and impactful. Most importantly, though, my friends and I managed to dine at the restaurant during our final week and it was worth every bite!


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