Tag: Specialized Masters



Women are on the rise at Olin Business School. Five tenure-track female professors join the faculty this fall in the areas of marketing, organizational behavior, and finance. Olin also welcomes a female visiting professor in economics from Carnegie Mellon. And on the student side of the desk, the MBA Class of 2019 is reporting an uptick in the gender category with 39% women.

“We are pleased to welcome so many talented newcomers to the Olin community,” said Vice Dean Todd Milbourn. “We will all benefit from the talent and knowledge they bring to our educational mission.”

Pictured above left to right, front row: Kang, Huang, Hardin; center row: Perfecto, Liao, organizational behavior postdoc; top row: Scott, Ruttan. Photo by Jerry Naunheim.

Ashley Hardin, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavioral

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of Michigan
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, University of Michigan
  • Research Interests: Quantitative Social Research, Quantitative Social Research, Social Psychology

Xing Huang, Assistant Professor of Finance

  • PhD, Economics, 2013, University of California at Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Assistant Professor of Finance, Michigan State University
  • Research Interests: Behavioral Finance, Asset Pricing, Investor Behavior, Market Efficiency, Information Acquisition, Mutual Funds, Household Finance

Karam Kang, Visiting Professor of Economics

  • PhD, Economics, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin:  Assistant Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Research Interests: Political Economy, Industrial Organization, Environmental Economics

Zhenyu Liao, Postdoc for Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organization, 2017, National University of Singapore
  • Prior to Olin: Research Assistant, National University of Singapore
  • Research Interests: Leadership Behavior and Dynamic, Event Perspective, Interpersonal Interaction

Hannah Perfecto, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Research Interests: Consumer Behavior, Behavioral Decision Theory, Metacognition, Field Experiments, Research Replicability and Reliability

Rachel Ruttan, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organizations, 2017, Northwestern University
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, Management and Organizations, Negotiations, Northwestern University
  • Research Interests: Compassion and Prosocial Behavior, Values and Moral Judgment, Emotion

Sydney Scott, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Marketing and Psychology, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Research Interests: Morality and Consumption, Judgment and Decision Making, Preferences for Natural Products

 




To the Washington University community:

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program should be continued and even expanded. With President Trump’s decision to rescind the program and end it within six months, I hope that Congress acts quickly to pass legislation to continue the DACA program so that those registered in the program and others who may be eligible can stay and continue to realize their full potential in this country.

As I have shared directly with our elected leaders, DACA is not only a moral imperative, but it also benefits the United States as a whole. Students who participate in the program have been raised here. They are part of our community, with great potential to make positive contributions to our country. We should be embracing them, not abandoning them.

Because of this decision, hundreds of thousands of young people and their families are scared and worried for their future. Members of Congress can address this and they should. I, and other university leaders, will continue to press elected officials on crafting a permanent solution as soon as possible.

Every Washington University student — regardless of immigration status, race, ethnicity, nationality or any other identity — deserves the same opportunity for academic success.

Here at our university:

  • The Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) is available to aid and assist students impacted by changes in DACA. OISS can provide information about available resources — including housing and legal assistance.
  • We will work directly with students impacted by changes in DACA to address challenges that may make it difficult for them to continue their studies, including financial hardships.
  • The Washington University Police Department’s (WUPD) primary role is to maintain a safe learning environment on our campuses. WUPD does not inquire about immigration status in carrying out their duties. Officers do not detain individuals based solely on their immigration status. Though WUPD is required to comply with lawful subpoenas and other legal requirements, it is not the university’s practice that WUPD will function as an agent of the federal government in the enforcement of federal immigration laws.
  • We zealously protect privacy of confidential student information. We will not release information about a student’s immigration or citizenship status to third parties unless required to do so by law or directive from a court.

You can learn more about available resources here.

Our university draws strength through our differences. We have a long tradition of attracting talented people from all around the world to our community and that will continue. It is on each of us to work to ensure that every member of our community feels welcome, included and empowered to succeed.

Sincerely yours,

Mark S. Wrighton

Image: Flickr Creative Commons Ana Paula Hirama, Statue of Liberty – NYC, Set2011




Hurricane Harvey’s torrential rainstorms and devastation along the Gulf Coast are difficult to comprehend, but it’s clear to see that the people in the flooded region need help. Individuals, nonprofits, and businesses are contributing to the rescue and recovery effort. Chancellor Wrighton’s message to the University community (below) suggests how you can help via the American Red Cross and the Greater Houston Community Foundation.

Mashable posted a long list of companies and what they are doing to help the victims of Harvey. Anheuser-Busch stopped beer production at one of its plants, to fill 50,000 cans with water for Red Cross shelters in areas damaged by the storms.

Link to find out what other companies are doing and how you can contribute to the aid efforts of Apple, Amazon and Whole Foods, Google, Microsoft, Walmart, and major cell carriers to name a few.

Chancellor Wrighton’s message:

To the Washington University community:

Hurricane Harvey continues to deal a devastating blow to eastern Texas and, now, is threatening a broader region. Many of our current students and alumni come from the affected areas; others of us know people who have been impacted or are at risk. They, their families, friends and loved ones are going through a horribly difficult ordeal. Our thoughts remain with them.

The images stemming from this historic natural disaster are heartbreaking. At the same time, the stories of herculean rescue efforts and people coming together to help one another are heartwarming. Here at Washington University, our community is built on the foundation of care and support we extend to each other and to others, particularly in times of crisis. This is one of those times and I know many of you are looking for ways to lend a helping hand. If you would like to donate to response and recovery efforts, following are two of the many organizations requiring resources. Every contribution — no matter the size — can make a difference.

American Red Cross
Greater Houston Community Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

If you or someone you know is experiencing personal difficulties in dealing with the aftermath of this tragedy, I hope you will take advantage of the counseling resources available for students through Student Health Services on the Danforth Campus and Student & Occupational Health Services on the Medical Campus, and for our faculty and staff through our Employee Assistance Program.

Many are predicting that Hurricane Harvey could become the worst flooding disaster in U.S. history. People are hurting and the recovery will take a long time. Please remain vigilant for the long haul and do what you can to help.

Sincerely yours,

Mark S. Wrighton




David R. Meyer, Senior Lecturer in Management at Olin, spent a week in Beijing and Xi’an, China this summer lecturing on FinTech, global finance, and China’s One Belt and One Road (OBOR)  initiative. The OBOR program is estimated to include $5 trillion in infrastructure spending across 60-plus countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa, according to an article on Quartz written by journalist Zheping Huang. “The “One Belt” part of it refers to the Silk Road Economic Belt,” explains Huang, “while the ‘One Road’ refers to the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road. Jointly, they’re meant to be a revival of the ancient Silk Road trading routes.”

Meyer shared this summary of his talk on OBOR with the Olin blog:

China’s “One belt, one road” initiative has the potential to transform its relations to Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. The linkages are embodied in the Silk Road Economic Belt and New Maritime Silk Road. The initiative is aimed at internal Asian economic development, a process never significantly supported by the countries of Asia or by external actors, especially in Europe and North America.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is the financing vehicle for intergovernmental cooperation, thus serving as enabler of the development process. This seed money supplements even larger sums from Asian governments and private sector actors who will supply most of the capital. Key infrastructure components include railroads, telecommunications, and ports, all to be integrated by sea and by land.

Successful implementation of this initiative will accelerate Asian development and lead to greater internal Eurasian economic integration. Failure of the United States to participate in the AIIB, even as most important world economies are members of the bank, relegates the U.S. to a weak participant in this major global-economic transformation.

David Meyer’s lecture circuit in China this summer:

  • Lecture on “China’s “One belt, one road” initiative,” Capital Normal University, Beijing, China, July 31, 2017
  • Talk on “China as a leader in global FinTech,” FinTech’s Impact on the Real Estate Market in Chinese Financial Centers, American Chamber of Commerce in China, Beijing, China, August 1, 2017
  • Talk on “Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing,” Jones Lang LaSalle, Beijing, China, August 1, 2017
  • Lecture on “China’s financial centers under global uncertainty,” Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, August 3, 2017
  • Dinner with Washington University in St. Louis alumni, Beijing, China, August 3, 2017
  • Talk on “China’s ‘One belt, one road’ initiative: Impact on global financial networks,” Conference on “Silk Road and Urban Development in China and Beyond”, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an, China, August 5-6, 2017.



Kelley performs at Shakespeare at Olin.

You might have seen him on stage at Olin’s Shakespeare Festival in April, or in other productions around town, or teaching improv to business students in the Active Learning Lab. When he’s not acting or teaching acting, Mark Kelley can be found in the Graduate Programs Office at Olin, where he is a staff member.

In the latest episode of St. Louis Public Radio’s Cut & Paste podcast, Kelley and his wife, Christina Rios, are profiled as a theater couple. Rios is artistic director of St. Louis theater company R-S Theatrics and Kelley is board president for the nonprofit troupe. The couple have four children—three under the age of six and one teen.

Listen in as the couple “profess more delight than drama in managing marriage and kids,” and share a common bond in their dedication to the art of the theater.

 

 

Top photo credit: Nancy Fowler, St. Louis Public Radio, Mark Kelley, center, coaching actors on stage fighting at a rehearsal of In the Heights, while his wife Christina Rios looks on.

All other photos: Jerry Naunheim, Jr.


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