Tag: Specialized Masters



Ranjeet Ahluwalia

The 2018 Olin Business magazine shared a series of vignettes featuring alumni faced with a business decision requiring them to weigh data with their values. We featured these stories to support Olin’s strategic pillar focused on equipping leaders to confront challenge and create change, for good. This is one of those vignettes.

The silence on the conference call was deafening. Seven years ago, when Ranjeet Ahluwalia, MBA ’05, was a healthcare advertising agency strategist, the team dialed in with notable physician thought leaders seeking to sell an Alzheimer’s treatment. Ahluwalia’s agency hoped to score a contract worth as much as $20 million.

Before the call, the agency pored through data about the drug, seeking information they could use to make a compelling case for the new medication. Somehow, for Ahluwalia, now founder and lead sparker at Silbospark, the clinical data just wasn’t adding up.

On the conference call, he asked a physician expert to help him “find the story” in the data that would help sell the drug. That prompted an independent pharmaceutical expert on the call to ask, “Based on what you see here, would you give this drug to your mother?”

Silence.

Ahluwalia’s firm didn’t get the contract. In fact, the drug never went to market.

“Ultimately, we had to decide whether to tell them what they wanted to hear or what they needed to hear,” Ahluwalia said. “We told them what they needed to hear—and we didn’t win the business.”




Commencement season is upon us, and we couldn’t be more proud of the class of 2019. Whether you’re finishing your BSBA, your master’s or your doctorate, we have plenty of reasons – and opportunities – to celebrate you. Here’s the rundown on your Olin graduation ceremonies.

Undergraduate

The 158th annual WashU May Commencement Ceremony takes place Friday, May 17 at 8:30 a.m. in Brookings Quadrangle. Learn more.

BSBA Recognition Ceremony: Friday, May 17, 11:30 a.m. at the Field House, Athletic Complex. If you’re attending, get the details on arrival, seating, the ceremony and more.

Can’t make it? Watch via livestream on the Olin graduation website or our Facebook page.

Graduate

The 158th annual WashU May Commencement Ceremony takes place Friday, May 17 at 8:30 a.m. in Brookings Quadrangle. Learn more.

Graduate Programs Recognition Ceremony: Friday, May 17, 3:00 p.m. at the Field House, Athletic Complex. If you’re attending, get the details on arrival, seating, the ceremony and more.

Can’t make it? Watch via livestream on the Olin graduation website or our Facebook page.

Other recognition ceremonies

All week, WashU will hold ceremonies to recognize and honor various populations – from members of our military to cultural recognition to students with children and families. See the full list.

For faculty

Graduation isn’t just for the students – it’s a celebration and an honor for our faculty members, too. Faculty information can be found on our graduation website (password protected).

Did we answer your question?

If not – check out our graduation website for more information, or for WashU questions, contact commencement@wustl.edu.




Paulino do Rego Barros Jr.

The 2018 Olin Business magazine shared a series of vignettes featuring alumni faced with a business decision requiring them to weigh data with their values. We featured these stories to support Olin’s strategic pillar focused on equipping leaders to confront challenge and create change, for good. This is one of those vignettes.

When Retail Credit Corporation was founded in Atlanta nearly 120 years ago, the company kept paper files on consumers to gauge their creditworthiness. “This industry has grown from looking at a file and just saying, ‘Does he pay his bills? Yes or no?’” said Paulino do Rego Barros Jr., MBA ’91.

Indeed, as a veteran executive at the company now known as Equifax, he’s on the vanguard of the power and pitfalls the massive data revolution has wrought on the industry and its customers. Equifax and its competitors wield data that tracks purchases, evaluates how reliably customers pay bills, and measures customer assets.

In spite of the power, Barros said, “there is a strong sense of stewardship and ethics.” That sense of stewardship came through a little more than a year ago when hackers breached Equifax.

Two days after he was named interim CEO, Barros apologized to consumers and customers in The Wall Street Journal. Barros is now US Information Solutions, president and former interim CEO, Equifax.

“We didn’t live up to expectations,” he wrote. Under his leadership, the company gave consumers free credit monitoring services, upgraded its website, boosted access to call-center support, and instituted other measures to regain the faith of consumers and customers.

“The regulatory framework establishes very clearly what we can or cannot do with consumer data,” he said. “But the decisions I made—and our ethical and moral values—are very important to us.”




Munir Mashooqullah

The 2018 Olin Business magazine shared a series of vignettes featuring alumni faced with a business decision requiring them to weigh data with their values. We featured these stories to support Olin’s strategic pillar focused on equipping leaders to confront challenge and create change, for good. This is one of those vignettes.

In 2012, Munir Mashooqullah’s company was an acquisition target. For shareholders, the deal might have made sense: Mashooqullah, EMBA ’98, and an Olin Distinguished Alumnus, said the acquiring company had higher profit margins and better systems and IT infrastructure.

Even some of his employees thought the deal would be good for Synergies Worldwide, which manages apparel sourcing and supply chain management for the “fast fashion” industry. “Everyone was saying, ‘Why can’t you be more like them?’” said Mashooqullah, founder and custodian, Synergies Worldwide. “I lost people. I lost tactile monetary opportunities.”

Clients, however, didn’t like the deal. They liked their current service. They appreciated the value they received.

“There are stories in leadership where you do not go with what is told to you just because the numbers look right,” he said.

Today, the company Mashooqullah founded 31 years ago is thriving. In fact, a senior executive for the competitor jumped ship to become the CEO when Mashooqullah retired in 2016.

“If there is something you believe in— and you’re not just driven by the dollar sign—in retrospect, many times people win,” Mashooqullah said. “But at the time, it may not look right.”




Tom Tian, BSBA; Lilu Li, MSF-WAM; Robert Huang, MSFC; Tim Solberg; Alvin Nguyen, MSFC; Carl Compton, BSBA; James Pai Hao-Lun, MSF; winners of the 2019 Quinnipiac portfolio competition.

For the second time in as many years, a WashU Olin team grabbed the first-place trophy at the prestigious Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Competition in New York City March 28-30, 2019.

A six-member team of master’s of finance students and BSBAs competed against 75 teams for the trophy in a competition culminating months of work managing a portion of the Washington University endowment fund, analyzing stock choices and presenting about the team’s investment strategy.

Olin Professor Tim Solberg coached the winning team, which included Tom Tian, BSBA ’20; Lilu Li, MSF-WAM ’19; Robert Huang, MSFC ’19; Alvin Nguyen, MSFC ’19; Carl Compton, BSBA ’19; and James Pai Hao-Lun, MSF ’19.

“Professor Solberg successfully put together a very diversified team,” said Nguyen, the team leader. “James has advanced technical skills, therefore he increased our team productivity by gathering necessary data from different sources, then cleaning them up, and uploading them to Bloomberg for analysis. Liyu’s quantitative background, Robert’s in-depth fundamental knowledge, and Tom’s quick thinking enabled us to combine all the resources needed to conduct our comprehensive analysis report quickly and efficiently.

“Carl transformed our analysis into an excellent PowerPoint presentation and collaborated with other team members to polish their presentation skills,” he added. “I leveraged the strengths of my teammates so we can work in complementary partnership to maximize each other’s strengths and compensate for individual weaknesses.”

An Olin team also won the same competition last year. In both cases, the students had participated in WashU’s “investment praxis” course, taught by senior lecturer Charles Cuny and Solberg. In the course, students manage a $1 million segment of Washington University’s endowment.

This year’s team didn’t have to fight through a wicked nor’easter to make it to the competition, but they shared the same appreciation for the discipline, teamwork and rigor required to compete.

“The competition gave me a much more holistic, hands on experience to the world of finance than is readily available at most schools,” Compton said. “The ability to run $1 million of real money puts much more emphasis on the psychological side of finance that escapes the normal classroom setting. It is very easy for students to nod their head in agreement when a company is worth buying or selling, but when the money is tangible, you begin to question your assumptions and selling policy.”

Using the new finance lab in the Kopolow Library, Solberg taught the team how to use Bloomberg terminals to determine portfolio attributions by industry sector and stock selection. It was while coaching the team last year he realized a financial lab would be much better for tutoring than having terminals spread throughout the campus.

Compton said the competition forced the team to do performance attribution and analyze a portfolio from multiple different angles, pushing them to better understand where their portfolio was underperforming or outperforming—and why.

“It’s easy to give a presentation on a portfolio that does better than the market, because no one questions you,” he said. “It is much more difficult to be convincing when your portfolio underperforms the market, and you have to argue that the portfolio performed exactly as it was expected to, even with huge drawdowns from unforeseeable losses from two holdings.”

He said the team felt confident standing in front of a panel of judges, delivering a robust answer to every question “and walking out of the room knowing you killed it.”

Pictured above: Tom Tian, BSBA ’20; Lilu Li, MSF-WAM ’19; Robert Huang, MSFC ’19; Tim Solberg; Alvin Nguyen, MSFC ’19; Carl Compton, BSBA ’19; James Pai Hao-Lun, MSF ’19.