Tag: Specialized Masters



A scene from the 2017 graduate student programs graduation recognition ceremony.

Dean Mark Taylor shared the following message with the Olin community before the graduate recognition ceremony on May 18, 2018.

The Olin Graduate Programs Recognition Ceremony is special for many reasons. Certainly, we share and take great pride in the triumph of our exuberant graduates—now prepared and eager to step from the graduation stage into a new phase of their lives.

The ceremony is also special because it recognizes and celebrates a small number of outstanding faculty and students whose contributions truly helped define the Olin journey for this class. I am delighted and honoured to share with you this year’s awards and honors.

David Allston: Joseph W. Towle Prize. Awarded to the graduating MBA student who, in the judgment of the faculty, exhibits the strongest academic achievement and the most potential in the area of organizational leadership. This award is named in honor of Joseph W. Towle, who was a tenured Olin management professor from 1954 to 1975 and a leader among faculty. Well-known in his field, an author, and president of the Academy of Management, he established this prize to encourage excellence in the classroom.

Cole Anthony Donelson: John Wayne Latchum Memorial Award. Recognizes the graduating MBA student who best exemplifies the qualities of integrity, loyalty to friends and country, courage, intelligence, and high standards of personal conduct as judged by the faculty. This award is named in memory of John Wayne Latchum, a business student who died in 1971 while he was a senior at Washington University. It is made possible through the generosity of his parents. Hubert C. Moog Prize. Awarded to the graduating MBA student who, in the opinion of his or her fellow students, best exemplifies the qualities of character, leadership, and service and also enjoys the respect, admiration, and affection of his or her classmates. This award is named in honor of Hub Moog, who as chairman and president of Moog Automotive, transformed his family’s St. Louis-based business into a world-renowned corporation. He served on the Washington University Board of Trustees and the Olin Task Force in 1980 and 1981. He and his wife, Dorothy R. Moog, were strong supporters of Washington University.

Ross Alan EricksonProfessional Achievement Award. Awarded to the graduating Professional MBA student who best exemplifies the qualities of integrity, loyalty, intelligence, and high moral character as judged by the faculty.

Molly Goldstein: Center for Experiential Learning Impact Award. Recognizes graduating students who have delivered the highest level of impact to the business and nonprofit communities through The Center for Experiential Learning (CEL) and other Olin-sponsored experiential programs and activities. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that advanced the missions and objectives of the organizations and individuals with which they engaged.

Christine Haverly: Outstanding Corporate Finance Student Award. Awarded to the graduating Master of Science in Corporate Finance and Investments student who, in the judgment of the faculty, exhibits the strongest academic achievement and the most potential in the field of finance.

Brenna Alexandria Humphries: Paul Cuffe MBA Award for Outstanding Leadership. Awarded to a graduating African-American MBA student for outstanding leadership, academic excellence, and involvement in Olin extracurricular activities. This award is named in honor of Paul Cuffe, who was one of the most financially successful black Americans at the end of the 18th century. A builder and maritime merchant in New England, Cuffe became a successful blockade runner during the Revolutionary War and an entrepreneur during the early years of American independence.

Youngho Kim: Dean’s Special Service Award. Awarded by the Dean to recognize MBA students who have rendered extraordinary service to Olin.

Ryan Lynch: Hiram and Mary Neuwoehner Prize. Awarded by the faculty to the graduating Professional MBA student who has been the most substantive addition to the evening program through contributions in the classroom and excellence in writing papers and taking examinations. This award was established by Mary Neuwoehner in the 1990s to honor her husband, Hiram Neuwoehner, BSBA ’41, a St. Louis advertising executive and founder of Batz-Hodgson-Neuwoehner Inc.

Roberto C. Ortiz: Center for Experiential Learning Impact Award. Recognizes graduating students who have delivered the highest level of impact to the business and nonprofit communities through The Center for Experiential Learning (CEL) and other Olin-sponsored experiential programs and activities. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that advanced the missions and objectives of the organizations and individuals with which they engaged.

Daniel Noel Tamasi: Dean’s Special Service Award. Awarded by the Dean to recognize MBA students who have rendered extraordinary service to Olin.

Raj Krishen Thapar: Milford Bohm Prize in Marketing. Awarded to the graduating MBA student who, in the judgment of the faculty, exhibits the strongest academic achievement and the most potential in the field of marketing. This award was established in honor of Milford Bohm―founder, chairman, and CEO of CPI (formerly Rembrandt Studio) from 1942 to 1973―by his wife, Lee Bohm, and their children, Mimi (MBA ’79), David (LA ’78/JD ’84), Rob (MBA ’90), and the late Vicki (EN ’84/SI ’85). Olin MBA Finance Award. Awarded to a graduating MBA student for achievement in finance.

Neelam Himansu Vyas: Dean’s Special Service Award. Awarded by the Dean to recognize MBA students who have rendered extraordinary service to Olin.

Wei XieOutstanding Wealth and Asset Management Finance Student Award. Awarded to the graduating Master of Science in Finance Wealth and Asset Management student who, in the judgment of the faculty, exhibits the strongest academic achievement and the most potential in the field of wealth and asset management.

Jessica Lynn Youngblood: CEL’s Taylor Outstanding Service Award. Awarded to the graduate or graduates who delivered the highest level of impact to the St. Louis local nonprofit community through the Center for Experiential Learning’s Taylor Community Consulting program. Awardees distinguished themselves with exceptional effort and leadership that resulted in demonstrated advancement of the missions and objectives of the organizations and communities with which they engaged. Peer Recognition Award. Awarded to the graduating Professional MBA student who, in the opinion of his or her fellow students, best exemplifies the qualities of character, leadership, and service and also enjoys the respect, admiration, and affection of his or her classmates.

Fan Zhang: Powell Niland Prize. Awarded to the graduating MBA student with the strongest academic achievement in the areas of operations and manufacturing management. This award is named in honor of Powell Niland, who was a tenured Olin operations and manufacturing management professor from 1957 to 1989 and an Olin professor emeritus from 1989 until 2009.

Charles F. Knight Scholars: Awarded to the graduate students who have earned the highest academic achievement in their program. This award was established by the Emerson Company to honor its then distinguished chairman and great benefactor to Olin Business School, who died in September 2017.

Full-Time MBA

  • Cole Anthony Donelson
  • Robert James Garwitz
  • Ramin Matthew Lalezari
  • Fengjia Brian Liu
  • Naohisa Matsumoto
  • Phuong Huyen Nguyen
  • Daniel Henry Nordin
  • Daniel Noel Tamasi
  • Raj Krishen Thapar
  • Jeffrey Donald Wertenberger

Professional MBA

  • Ross Owen Barthold
  • Rachel Ann Broadbear
  • Ryan David Brockman
  • Daniel Matthew Gilmore
  • David Edward Kekec
  • Daniel Robert Kohnen
  • Sean Michael Loughran
  • Kirsten McCain
  • Richard John Payton
  • Charles Robert Whitmer

Master of Accounting

  • Rebecca Marianne Brody
  • Feiyang Gao
  • Xinyi Huang

Master of Science in Customer Analytics

  • Jianan Chen
  • Qian Sun
  • Yang Yu

Master of Science in Finance—Corporate Finance and Investments

  • Shahzeb Khan Ghani
  • Christine Haverly
  • Yuchen Liu

Master of Science in Finance—Quantitative Finance

  • Xiangji Chen
  • Qi Li
  • Yuming Lou

Master of Science in Finance—Wealth and Asset Management

  • Hao Sha
  • Jingya Wu
  • Wei Xie
  • Yun Peng Zhao

Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

  • Yingyi Bao
  • Patrick Cauthen Mordente

Pictured above: A scene from the 2017 graduate student programs graduation recognition ceremony.




Allison Halpern, BSBA ’18, wrote this post on behalf of Bauer Leadership Center.

Last week, the Bauer Leadership fellows discussed the challenges and responsibilities of a leader. All fellows are MBA students serving as Center for Experiential Learning team leads for a project within their practicum program. In this role, they need to manage relationships with their teammates, mentors, and clients.

To navigate these winding roads successfully, they collaborated and role played tough situations to understand how to solve problems and create impact as a leader. To extend this conversation beyond the meeting walls, I wanted to share their words of wisdom here to continue building values-based leaders here at WashU.

Communicate Early; Set Goals; Manage Expectations

Many fellows discussed coming into a team with prior friendships with other members. Established relationships can be difficult to break, especially if you are coming into a role as a superior with a team of fellow students. It is important to set the goals up front for you as a leader and other team members in various roles to give them freedom and leadership.

This allows everyone to have responsibilities where they can shine. It also grounds you with a sense of authority and respect.

And these conversations go beyond the team, too. Each group has a mentor to guide them through the practicum. They are there for guidance and to provide a more experienced perspective, but making sure they are doing this properly can be difficult.

Taylor Ohman, previous CEL team lead and BLC Fellow, said it well: “This is the Center for Experiential Learning—the point is to work through the struggles and learn how to do better.”

With this in mind, its important for this mentor to let students solve problems to learn and grow in this safe space.

Take on the Responsibility of the Team

As one of the fellows said it, be a “leader servant.” Leaders will get much of the praise when things go well—and all of the brunt if they don’t. If another teammate is having an off week, it is on the leader to pick up the slack.

And if nitty-gritty administrative work needs to be done, it is important for the leader to pick up on it to allow the rest of the team to focus on the parts that matter most to them. As a leader, it is your job to bring the best out of your team.

Sometimes, that means doing the not-so-glamorous work and taking the fall when things go wrong. But it’s also important to know how to bounce back.

Adapt, Improvise, and Shift Plans, If Needed

Of course, you can set goals and take on hard responsibilities, but some things just might not go as you thought—and that’s OK. As a leader, it is critical to learn how to act on your feet and continually manage performance.

If someone is not performing up to par, discuss it with this person in a direct, mature, and decisive manner. Improvise on what their responsibilities are to provide tasks that can be benchmarks for success. Every team member will work differently, so work to understand these differences to create a cohesive team dynamic.




Dean Mark Taylor recently announced the speakers for Olin Business School’s graduation recognition ceremonies on May 18.

It gives me great pleasure to announce this year’s keynote speakers for Olin’s Undergraduate Graduation Recognition Ceremony and Olin’s Graduate Graduation Recognition Ceremony.

Razzy Ghomeshi

Razzy Ghomeshi

The undergraduate ceremony speaker will be Razzy Ghomeshi, BSBA ’09. The ceremony will take place on Friday, May 18, at 11:30 p.m. in the Athletic Complex, Field House.

In a very short time, Razzy Ghomeshi has built a widely recognized reputation for reliability, helpfulness, and investment savvy. In the nine years since graduating from WashU’s Olin Business School, he’s risen rapidly through the ranks at RBC Capital Markets, where he started a few weeks after earning his degree.

Today, Ghomeshi, 30, is managing director at RBC, heading up US investment-grade trading for the company. His rise began within two years of starting at RBC when he earned his own trading book and consistently notched the highest profit-and-loss and trading volumes across the investment-grade trading desk.

Five years later, he was running the desk. Business Insider highlighted Ghomeshi’s financial acumen when it named him a “Wall Street Rising Star” in October 2017. Finance industry analytics firm Greenwich Associates has named Ghomeshi one of its “most helpful traders on Wall Street” three times in his short career.


Sandeep Chugani

Sandeep Chugani

The graduate programs speaker will be Sandeep Chugani, EN ’89, MBA ’91. The ceremony will be on Friday, May 18, at 3:00 p.m. in the Athletic Complex, Field House.

Sandeep Chugani, senior partner and managing director for Boston Consulting Group, leads the firm’s Miami office. The range of his consulting expertise is broad, drawing on experience in developing more effective organizations, creating strategies for corporate transformations and turnarounds, creating paths for organizational growth, improving clients’ merchandise and marketing efforts, and optimizing corporate cash-flow performance.

Previously, Chugani has led BCG’s practices in transformation and retail in North America. Before joining BCG, he was a senior partner at A.T. Kearney and a managing director (partner) at DiamondCluster International, working in the consumer products and retail practice.

Chugani serves on Olin’s National Council and regularly visits the Washington University campus to advise students with insights on the consulting and client landscape, what it takes to be successful in consulting, and to engage in regular Q&A segments.

Get full details about both ceremonies at the graduation pages:




Sarah Kaplan, BFA 2018, wrote this post on behalf of the Bauer Leadership Center.

Through a panel discussion cohosted by the Bauer Leadership Center and the Century Club Business Series, the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award honorees shared how value systems have shaped their career paths.

  • Zack Boyers, MBA 01’, chairman and CEO, U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corp., St. Louis.
  • Shirley Cunningham, MBA ’08, executive vice president, AG Business and Enterprise Strategy, CHS Inc., Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota.
  • Munir Mashooqullah, MBA ’98, founder and custodian, Synergies Worldwide, Thailand.
  • Richard Ritholz, BSBA ’84, partner, senior portfolio manager and head of global commodities trading, Elliott Management Corporation, New York City.

A defining theme throughout the discussion was the significance of having a global perspective while relying on a focused value system.

Global Thinking

Richard Ritholz described not understanding globalization as going into a fight with one arm tied behind your back. In an increasingly “fast-changing and globalized world,” an appreciation for how other people think is incredibly important.

Having spent time abroad in England, Italy, Norway, and Holland working for Mobil Oil, Ritholz had to assimilate across many cultures.

“It really opened up my mind,” he said. “Without the experience of internationalization, I just don’t think I would have thought about things with as open a mind as I was able to, and I am not so sure I would have been as successful.”

Shirley Cunningham likewise shared how in her experience working around the world, a global perspective makes you think more broadly. “It makes you think in a more rounded way if you think about the globe as the opportunity versus just a narrow strip.”

With global opportunity also comes global responsibility. Munir Mashooqullah pointedly stated that all of us now have a global footprint.

“You cannot be a leader or a manager or have skills without understanding how things work around the world,” he said. Mashooqulla shared a tip he picked up from the president/CEO of Bain: CEOs have to be the leader of an ecosystem, not just a singular asset. This applies to not only global corporations, but also national organizations.

As Zach Boyers shared that working in a primarily US-based company, technology and global change still affect national organizations. In handling these global shifts and changes, it is important to have a dedicated core set of values to act upon.

Focused Values

In addressing a global business world, all four alums agreed on the importance of not just having core values, but focusing on implementing them within one’s own organization. Boyers got to the heart of the matter: “The question really becomes, what do values mean in practice and in an operating model in your business?”

To implement a core value of teamwork into his own operating model, Ritholz starts by understanding the impact of teamwork, then “I work backward and try to figure out what we need in order to engender that type of teamwork, spirit, and camaraderie.”

Mashooqullah shared another strategy implementing a values-based culture: Values must start at the top.

“We put on our website that reputation is what other people think of you, and that character is what you are,” he said. “Culture is important because without that, you cannot pre-populate an organization with what you think.”

Without a cultivated culture, it is difficult to act on specified values. Cunningham also emphasized a values-based culture. She shared an experience working in a blame-oriented culture.

From relying on her core values of integrity and problem solving, she was able to re-align with a business environment, which also supported that belief system. When it comes to values in a global world, a resounding reminder from these alums is that you cannot just talk to the talk, but you must walk the walk.

Be sure to click this link to see the Distinguished Alumni Symposium on April 12, 2018, or view the video below.




Don Dorsey, pictured in 2004,

Don Dorsey, pictured in 2004

C. Donald Dorsey, a member of Olin’s National Council, a longtime scholarship supporter, and distinguished alumnus, died on Thursday (May 3, 2018). He was 76.

Mr. Dorsey served as a senior executive for PetSmart during its rapid expansion from seven stores to more than 500. He even served a stint as interim CEO for the company’s operations in the UK, where he was credited with stabilizing its operations in the late 1990s and positioning the overseas unit for continuous improvement at that time.

Longtime members of the Olin community recalled Mr. Dorsey as a tireless booster for Olin and Washington University, where he received his BSBA degree in 1964.

“He was pretty close to me,” said Robert Virgil, dean emeritus at Olin. “He was one of my very first students when I started teaching. I go back a long way with him. I remember him well as a good student, a leader of his class and after graduating, a dedicated alum of Washington University—very generous.”

Virgil recalled Mr. Dorsey being very active in Washington University’s Scholarship Initiative Campaign. Indeed, he and his wife have been benefactors of the Donald and Lydia Dorsey Scholarship since 2006. Two years earlier, Mr. Dorsey had received Olin’s Distinguished Alumni Award for his career accomplishments.

“Don was a very special friend for Olin Business School and Washington University,” said Mahendra Gupta, former Olin dean and Geraldine J. and Robert L. Virgil Professor of Accounting and Management. “He loved his school and his university and was always there to support them and to be a great ambassador.”

Gupta recalled recruiting a reluctant Mr. Dorsey to the National Council by inviting him to a meeting, where he was impressed by the membership of the group and the intense dedication each member shared for the future of the school. He joined the council in 2009.

“Don was an engaged member of the Olin community through his service on our National Council,” Dean Mark Taylor said. “His commitment to supporting students is inspiring and I am grateful for how welcoming he was during my first year as dean.”

Career Highlights

Mr. Dorsey was a St. Louis native through-and-through, graduating from Normandy High School, attending Washington University, and signing on for his first job with Price Waterhouse locally. He worked there 12 years before moving into general management with retailers in the grocery, automotive, and eye-ware industries.

In 1989, Mr. Dorsey joined PetSmart—three years after it launched—as senior vice president and chief financial officer, helping the company through enormous growth. The chain had blossomed to more than 500 stores and Mr. Dorsey helped guide the company through its 1993 IPO before he retired in 1999.

“Being a CPA was a strong background for moving into general management,” Mr. Dorsey said upon receiving recognition as a distinguished alumnus. “In building PetSmart, we began by working with consumer focus groups to discover what our customers really needed. From that basis, we built on the concept of one-stop service for their pets.”

At about that time, after his leadership, the company’s UK unit was acquired by UK-based Pets at Home in December 1999. PetSmart later went private after its 2015 takeover by BC Partners for $8.7 billion.

Following his retirement, Mr. Dorsey worked as an adviser and investor for several development-stage consumer-related companies such as Ulta Beauty and Five Below.

His wife Lydia and his children were with him at the time of his death. Mr. Dorsey is survived by his wife, Lydia; daughter, Lisa. and son-in-law, Ken Stewart; daughter, Christine Dorsey; stepsons, Eric Bazarnic and Cliff Bazarnic; daughters-in-law, Lynn Ducey and Zoja Bazarnic.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Pictured above: National Council member and BSBA ’64 Don Dorsey with Frank Duan, BSBA ’16, recipient of the Donald and Lydia Dorsey Scholarship.


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