Tag: Specialized Masters



Thirteen new faculty members have joined Olin in the past year in accounting, finance, operations, strategy, and marketing.

Tenure-track faculty

SETH CARNAHAN, Associate professor of strategy
PhD: Strategy, 2013, University of Maryland
Prior to Olin: Sanford R. Robertson Assistant Professor of Business Administration and Assistant Professor of Strategy at the University of Michigan
Research Interests: Firm strategy, entrepreneurship, and human capital; how competition for human capital affects firm performance; why individuals create startup firms

XIANG HUI, Assistant professor of marketing
PhD: Economics, 2016, Ohio State University
Prior to Olin: Postdoctoral associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Research Interests: Design of digital platforms and economics of digitization, how consumers’ experience with service providers on such platforms could be enhanced through platform policies and strategies that improve information or other aspects

MARYJANE RABIER, Assistant professor of accounting
PhD: Accounting, 2014, University of Maryland
Prior to Olin: Assistant professor of accounting, McGill University
Research Interests: Recent research, “Value is in the Eye of the Beholder: The Relative Valuation Roles of Earnings and Book Value in Merger Pricing,” was published in the Accounting Review, Vol. 93, No. 1, 2018

Visiting professors

ABER ELSALEIBY, Visiting assistant professor of operations and manufacturing management
PhD: Manufacturing and technology management, 2015, University of Toledo
Prior to Olin: Lecturer of operations management, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Research Interests: Manufacturing and service operations management, healthcare operations management/analytics, supply chain network design

*ILIAS FILIPPOU, Visiting assistant professor of finance
PhD: Finance, 2015, The University of Warwick
Prior to Olin: Assistant professor of financial economics, Warwick Business School
Research Interests: Asset pricing, international finance, macro-finance

MENG LIU, Visiting assistant professor of marketing
PhD: Economics, 2015, Clemson University
Prior to Olin: Postdoctoral associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Research Interests: Auctions and mechanism design, specifically in the contexts of government procurement contracts; the emerging sharing economy of the digital era; The impact of Uber on the traditional taxi industry

Yaron Leitner, Visiting professor of finance
PhD: Finance, 2001, Northwestern University
Prior to Olin: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia
Research Interests: Banking and financial institutions, information economics

ALESSIO SARETTO, Visiting assistant professor of finance
PhDs: Finance, 2006, University of California, Los Angeles; mathematical finance, 2002, University of Brescia
Prior to Olin: Assistant professor of finance and managerial economics, University of Texas at Dallas
Research Interests: Empirical asset pricing, capital structure, credit risk, and structured finance. Saretto has been published in Management Science, Review of Financial Studies, Journal of Fixed Income, and the Journal of Financial Markets

Professors of practice

PETER BOUMGARDEN, Professor of practice, organizational behavior
PhD: Organizational behavior/strategy, 2010, Washington University in St. Louis
Prior to Olin: Associate professor of management, Hope College
Research Interests: Researches, consults and facilitates executive education in the private and nonprofit sectors on topics of innovation, corporate strategy, marketing strategy and leadership development. Clients include Herman Miller, Edward Jones, Charles Schwab, Oracle and others

JEREMY DEGENHART, Professor of practice, finance
BSBA: 2000, Washington University in St. Louis.
Prior to Olin: Adjunct professor of finance, Olin Business School
Research Interests: Global Impact Investing Network, Advantage Capital, Solar Energy Industries Association

TIMOTHY SOLBERG, Professor of practice, finance
MBA: 1982, University of Chicago
Prior to Olin: Olin faculty advisor and lecturer, Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Forum
Research Interests: Economic development, health economics, international economics, banking and financial institutions, corporate governance

MICHAEL WALL, Professor of practice, marketing
BA: 2001, Indiana University
Prior to Olin: Adjunct lecturer, Olin Business School
Research Interests: Innovation, digital marketing, leadership

Research scholar

DAVID SOVICH, postdoc for finance
PhD: Finance, 2018, Washington University in St. Louis
Prior to Olin: PhD intern, Equifax Inc.
Research Interests: Empirical household finance, real effects of financial markets

*Not pictured. Pictured above, from left, first row: Yaron Leitner, MaryJane Rabier, Alessio Saretto, Timothy Solberg, Seth Carnahan. Second row: Peter Boumgarden, Meng Liu, David Sovich, Aber Elsaleiby. Third row: Xiang Hui, Jeremy Degenhart, Michael Wall.




More than 2,000 years ago, the Roman poet Virgil famously said, “Fortune favours the bold.” In today’s vernacular, he would have said, “Go big or go home.” At Olin, we’re going big. And we’re going bold.

We’re doing it by launching a sweeping renovation of the full-time WashU Olin MBA. Students who arrive in mid-2019 will be the first to embark on what is arguably the most global MBA programme anywhere in the world.

Two weeks after they arrive for orientation and introductory classwork in late June—yes, that early—every first-year MBA student will depart for an around-the-world immersion in global business. And I’m not speaking metaphorically. The summer semester continues with a week at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Then two weeks in Barcelona. Then 17 days in Shanghai.

Students will dive deeply into the fundamental principles of business management in the context of each country’s local economy. Morning classes move to afternoon projects as students roll up their sleeves and apply their knowledge, doing research and analyzing real-world business problems with local executives. This isn’t academic tourism. It’s not a St. Louis class transferred to Spain or China. It’s serious work gaining cultural intelligence about global business and leadership issues.

When students return to St. Louis, they’ll be equipped to continue their core classes in strategy, economics, accounting, marketing, finance, and operations—but with global context and the perspective of several economic systems. Plus, they’ll have forged deep bonds with their classmates, a foundation to support, grow and advance one another throughout their Olin careers.

Additionally, students can accelerate their programme under our new model, moving more quickly to the job market, or pair their MBA with a specialized master’s degree.

Why embark on such a sweeping change to Olin’s flagship program? The answer, quite simply, is that we must practise what we preach. The world is shrinking. Leadership challenges are expanding. As we urge students to do, we must anticipate what the market will demand in the future—then think big and act boldly to confront the challenge. Tinkering around the margins won’t do.

We paired that principle with data. We informed our work with the help of Boston Consulting Group, which researched the needs of students and companies in the future. They interviewed current students, prospective students, faculty, corporate recruiters, and more, generating data about the requirements of a redesigned MBA programme.

In some ways, we’ve been building to this for a while. Recent MBA classes have had expanding global opportunities through the Center for Experiential Learning and the Brookings MBA capstone experience. This spring, we plan to pilot some of the global components of the redesigned curriculum, though details are yet to be ironed out.

On the Olin website now, there’s more detail available about our MBA renovation—designed with BCG, taught by world class experts on three continents, one truly global MBA. It is a renovation, I firmly believe, that will be favoured by fortune—for Olin and our students.




In one of Olin Business School’s newest magazine ads, white text pops from a field of rich red in type that evokes a sense of strength and wonder. Just a few words, strategically aligned on the page, draw the reader into a story of unknown origin—and clear gravity.

“When the cost of goods comes at a cost … we pause.”

Within that pause, Olin invites readers to consider the consequences of the decisions they’ll make and the preparation WashU offers for a business world demanding principled, evidence-based leadership.

Within that pause lies the mission of Olin Business School, its promise to students and the marketplace, and the pillars that underpin our strategic plan.

And from within that pause comes the bold voice of Olin Business School’s new brand identity, articulating what we are, what we stand for, and how our strategic plan sets us apart among the world’s top schools.

“We’re making a bold claim on what’s always been in our DNA: That we develop business leaders who create change, for good,” said Dean Mark Taylor, architect of Olin’s strategic plan. “It’s important for all of us to take ownership of this idea so we can clearly articulate our point of view on business education, attract the right kind of talent, and be a distinctive voice in the marketplace, as drivers of global change.”

See the video below to get a better understanding about how Olin will position itself with its brand messaging.

Launching the new Olin brand

Marketing & Communications prepares for the brand launch event.

Marketing & Communications prepares
for the brand launch event.

The formal announcement of Olin’s new brand strategy came today in a schoolwide event drawing together faculty and staff. With video presentations, digital signs, a champagne toast, and speeches from the dean and a faculty leader, participants heard how the business school will use its brand messaging to talk about the elements of our strategic plan, our vision, our mission, our values, and our strategic priorities.

Dean Taylor stressed the importance of our strategic pillars — particularly the idea that Olin develops values-based, data-driven decision-makers.

“The truth behind those words isn’t new at all. We’ve taken a deep dive into how we want to think and talk about ourselves,” he said, adding to the crowd of faculty and staff assembled for the event “it’s vital that we all take ownership of our brand.”

The crowd applauded after watching the brand identity video (see above).

Stuart Bunderson, co-director of the Bauer Leadership Center and Olin’s George & Carol Bauer Professor of Organizational Ethics & Governance, reinforced the message: “We want every Olin student to say first, what do the data say and second, what values are at play here” when they are making business-oriented decisions.

After the speeches and a champagne toast, Olin employees dispersed to pick up swag bags, enjoy street food from a group of food trucks on Snow Way, romp at a selfie station, and take headshots that may be used in Olin branding campaigns down the road.

More details about the branding

The messaging comes together in a simple positioning statement that boldly declares who we are and how we’re different from other top business schools: “As a premier educator of business professionals, Olin Business School champions better decision-making by preparing and coaching a new academy of leaders who will change the world, for good.”

We do this through our pillars of excellence, the elements that drive our approach to preparing leaders:

  • Values Based and Data Driven
  • Globally Oriented
  • Experiential
  • Entrepreneurial

The brand work also offered an opportunity to address another niggling challenge: Our school’s eight-word, 55-character name. New guidelines offer a more streamlined identity: “WashU Olin Business School,” captured in a more casual brand “mark”—a variation on the formal logo—that we will use as a “nickname” for the school when the full name is also visible elsewhere.

We’ve also taken care to ensure that Olin’s brand aligns with the WashU master brand. The university is often the front door to the business school, so it’s important that the two entities align. Our story starts with the core idea of the master brand, but extends that idea in a relevant and meaningful way.

More information about the strategic plan and the brand messaging strategy is available on the Marketing & Communications section of Campus Groups, where visitors can download logos, templates, and fonts, as well as see guidance on the use of our brand and our colors.




Starting a new master’s program in business can be tough for anyone. Starting that program in a specialized, complex academic area after moving to the university from another country with its own set of values, cultures, and languages? That’s beyond daunting. But each year, students in the specialized master’s program come from across the globe to get an education—and a broader mindset—at Olin.

This year, the Office of Graduate Studies embarked on a new adventure with those students—dedicating the weeks before the semester started to acclimating international students to St. Louis. This began with Passport, an internationally-focused, three-week event that introduced students to the intricacies of American culture and interpersonal skills.

Also new this year and available to international and domestic students alike was Career Stamp, the professional counterpart to Passport that bolstered professional skills like self-branding and networking. Career Stamp is the product of the Weston Career Center’s resources, staff, and skills, led by Mark Schlafly.

Career Stamp attempts to bridge the gap between cultures by giving students a feel for the professional norms of US business in a safe space—whether they’re from the US or not. It’s meant to introduce students to a business way of thinking, through intensive career preparation before the semester begins.

“Things go so fast once the semester starts that it’s hard to find the time to get things done,” explained Laura Hollabaugh, academic advisor for SMP students. “These are things that will help students be prepared for whatever’s ahead. Passport and Career Stamp are the building blocks, and then the students can build the confidence to keep moving and not slow down.”

Those building blocks have given international students a new level of comfort with themselves and in their studies. Jessica Jiang, an incoming accounting student from Beijing, appreciated the use of the CareerLeader self-assessment and how it helped her create a personal brand. “I didn’t know that I enjoyed leading people before I did the assessment.”

While the self-assessment, as well as other presentations on research and job skills, were incredibly important, many students’ favorite memory was an exercise in networking. Not a typically popular practice, particularly with brand-new international students, the networking session was made much brighter thanks to a presence from R-S Theatrics Company, which provided helpful tips on how improv can guide a person through life – and business.

Jiang appreciated learning the No. 1 rule of improv: always respond “yes, and.” “It means accept and adapt. It really works out for me,” she said. “I love to talk a lot—so maybe I have to listen more to adapt. I had to realize that maybe sometimes I’m shutting down the conversation.”

The R-S Theatrics team presents on the main rules of improv.

Dylan Chen (BSCS ’18), an incoming customer analytics student, appreciated the use of improv as a lens for learning to network. “Life is a lot like improvisation,” he reflected. “A lot of it is random, and you have to improvise on the spot to keep it going. Being able to be a people-person, make people feel like you care about them, are interested in them, and you want to have a conversation with them.”

The culmination of Career Stamp and the beginning of a new school year leaves much to be done – and these students’ time at WashU and in the US are only just beginning. But students are already seeing the intended impact—they’re learning about themselves, they’re growing, and they’re gaining confidence.

Take it from Jessica. “I think I changed a lot through these five weeks. I’m more extroverted after this program. I have more skills. I know how to talk to people, I know some principles to communicate and network. And I met a lot of my fellow classmates. We made great friendships.




Recording a video to introduce the Olin brand campaign that accompanies our strategic plan. Building scholarship capacity is an important piece of our strategy.

Someone supposedly once complained that Shakespeare’s Hamlet is full of quotations, and indeed, many lines from that great work have become familiar phrases in the English language, from “To be or not to be,” to “Alas, poor Yorick.”

One of my personal favourite lines from the play is, “Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be.”

Olin is a place that addresses the promise of that theme for students who may pass through our doors “knowing not what they may be.” With our world-class faculty, our dedicated staff and our alumni, we’re well able to help students know what they will be.

The trick, of course, is helping them pass through our doors in the first place.

That’s where scholarships come into play. WashU’s Olin Business School should be an elite institution, but never elitist. That means we want the best students in our community—regardless of their financial means. Anyone with the ability, talent and potential should be able to benefit from an Olin education.

A WashU education is by no means inexpensive, but this is not a new phenomenon. Even when National Council member Sidney Guller started earning his BSBA in 1943—and the average US income was $2,000 a year—Olin’s $250 annual tuition was a tough nut to crack.

At the time, scholarships were hard to come by. Guller worked at a local title company to make ends meet. That experience drove him to establish the Bobette and Sidney Guller Endowed Scholarship and many other gifts to the school.

Increasing scholarship support was an important component of Olin’s participation in the WashU Leading Together campaign, which closed in June. Building that support is vital to attracting talented and deserving students to our institution

Based on preliminary numbers from Olin’s campaign, I’m pleased to note that Olin supporters have contributed more than $31.8 million toward 94 new endowed scholarships—double the number from 2009, before Leading Together began. Additionally, benefactors have contributed to an additional 266 named scholarships since 2010.

I’m looking forward to meeting one of our newest scholarship recipients. One MBA student this fall will receive a new scholarship that I’ve established, the William Shakespeare Scholarship. Will was a great businessman as well as an artist, so I consider this a terrific nod to the way we think about approaching business problems from a variety of perspectives.

Now, I’ll be expecting our first recipient to join The Dean’s Players at our next “Shakespeare at Olin” event. Who knows what he or she may be?

Pictured above: Dean Taylor recording a video to introduce the Olin brand campaign that accompanies our strategic plan. Building scholarship capacity is an important piece of our strategy.


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