Tag: Full-time MBA



Entrepreneurship education at Washington University in St. Louis—at both the graduate and undergraduate levels—has again earned top 25 status in the latest ranking by The Princeton Review in partnership with Entrepreneur Magazine.

WashU held firm on its No. 7 ranking for undergraduate programs and moved up four spots to rank No. 18 in the graduate program ranking.

As one of four key strategic pillars for Olin Business School, this week’s entrepreneurship ranking was particularly timely for Clifford Holekamp, professor of practice in entrepreneurship and Olin’s academic director for entrepreneurship.

“It is gratifying to see our focus reflected in the national rankings for entrepreneurship,” he said. “Olin, the WashU community, and the greater St. Louis community provide incredibly robust opportunities for students in entrepreneurship, but this ranking is as much a credit to the students’ entrepreneurial efforts in seizing these opportunities.”

The ranking released on Tuesday noted that WashU’s undergraduate programs offer “28 entrepreneurship-related undergraduate courses. Over the last five years, its graduates have started 84 companies and have collectively raised over $329 million in funding.”

Among graduate programs in entrepreneurship, WashU “offers 33 entrepreneurship-related graduate courses. Over the last five years, its graduates have started 58 companies and have collectively raised over $100 million in funding.”

See the complete ranking of top 25 undergraduate and graduate programs.




Angela Lu, MBA ’19, is president of the Graduate Business Student Association and wrote this for the Olin Blog.

One hundred and fifty-three days left in office.

We’re past the midway point of our term “in office.” I know because I laid out the timeline for the academic year over my summer, and installed a countdown timer on my web browser. It’s not that I can’t wait to graduate and move on from Olin; quite the contrary, I wanted to make sure that my team and I do not lose sight of how many days left we have to make an impact while still on campus.

So as the fall semester draws near its end, what have we been working on? How have we been doing?

We kicked off this year with three lofty goals: first, to increase Olin pride; second, to increase connectivity; and third, to increase accountability. The first, in many ways, we deem a natural derivative of the second two. In particular, we’ve really focused on increasing accountability.

I noted from the start that it wasn’t going to be easy. Holding others accountable for their actions sounds reasonable in theory, but few if any of us really enjoy starting a conversation, “Hey, you didn’t deliver on your promises and that was uncool.”

I am immensely proud of and grateful to my colleagues—the vice presidents of social programs, club presidents, etc.—who have boldly stepped up to the plate and enforced stricter RSVP policies for social as well as professional events. Together, we’ve turned away classmates without tickets at the door of Pin-Up Bowl (for our Welcome Back Party) and withheld food and beverage from walk-in event participants until the registered attendees had had their fill.

We’ve heard lots of grumblings. We’ve been questioned: Is this really necessary?

Here’s why we’re fundamentally trying to build a culture of heightened accountability: no one likes a flake. And while some events are more “informal” than others (such as social get-togethers), I firmly believe that they too are occasions for decorum. Since our integrity is built upon the sum of our consistent actions, we are behooved by our shared values to honor our commitments—and proactively communicate if we no longer are able to.

After all, it is exceedingly simple to change an RSVP response—it costs nothing save a few seconds. However, an accurate headcount for any event makes life much easier for an event organizer. It is an invaluable piece of data, but only if it is reliable. True professionalism stems from our ability to consider and be sensitive to the needs of others we interact with.

We fully acknowledge that the status quo—in companies, among friends, at school—may be less than ideal. Calendar invitations may be accepted and disregarded. Event registrations may frequently result in no-shows.

What is “normal” isn’t desirable—and here at Olin, we’re pushing ourselves to do better, and to be better. That’s why we’re tackling these tough conversations head on in building a culture of accountability and professionalism. We painstakingly seek to hold ourselves to higher standards so that we can all become our best possible selves. That is the growth and development we came to Olin for.

Pictured above: About 112 Olin graduate students at the GBSA club officers’ bootcamp in early October 2018.




Omoluyi Adesanya, MPH/MBA

In 2017, two organizations joined forces to launch what has now become an annual event: the First-Generation College Celebration. The Council for Opportunity in Education and the Center for First-generation Student Success created the annual commemoration to “celebrate the success of first-generation college students, faculty, and staff on (our) campus in any and every way possible.”

For our commemoration of first-generation college student day, WashU Olin introduces you to two members of our community: Omoluyi Adesanya, MPH/MBA ’20, and David Leon, BSBA ’20. Both speak of overcoming obstacles and their desire to capitalize on the sacrifices their families have made.

What does it mean to you to be the first in your family to go to college?

Adesanya: To me, being a part of the first generation in my family to go to college (after my elder brother) means overcoming the obstacles and challenges that have penetrated my family for generations.

Leon: Being the first in my family to go to college means making sure all the sacrifices my parents and family made to get me here don’t go to waste.

Adesanya: My mother’s family German heritage and immigrated to the USA from Germany. In the USA, they live in rural America as generational farmers in southern Illinois. At the age of 23, my father immigrated to the USA from Nigeria in pursuit of a more promising future filled with opportunity. My father was not familiar of the pathways of higher education in the US. My paternal grandmother, whom I am named after, was an illiterate, she never had the opportunity to attend school due to the fact that in Nigeria females did not have the right to obtain an education during her era.

Leon: I want to be an example for all the students who come after me, especially my siblings. It means paving a path and continuing to strive for change that will allow others the opportunity to be successful.

Adesanya: Being from a family of immigrants and having lived in both rural and urban America, I have seen first-hand the value of education from my own family’s lack of opportunity to obtain an education. Through these various setbacks, I do not look at the negative aspects; instead I see these disadvantages as a positive part of my life—times to make sure I accomplish my future aspirations. To me, having obtained a college degree and continuing my academic journey in a graduate program allows me to realize that knowledge truly is power. Throughout my educational pursuits and knowing my family’s humble beginnings, I have been inspired to build my personal resilience and determined to obtain an education, which much of my family did not have the opportunity to pursue. This is what being the first in my family to attend college means to me.

How do you envision using your education going forward?

Leon: I will use my education to continue to foster positive change in the communities I belong to, while exploring my passions and allowing my curiosity to lead me to new opportunities.

Adesanya: I am a dual-degree student doing the MPH/MBA program at the Brown School and Olin Business School. Based off of my past experiences, I have endured various circumstances which have inspired me to obtain an MPH/MBA degree. Having lived in both urban and rural areas of America, I have witnessed disparities particularly in the healthcare sector.

Leon: WashU has provided me with an education and skills that will continually allow me to make an impact throughout my career.

Adesanya: Throughout my education, I came to realize that the regions of which I grew up were very economically disadvantaged and medically underserved. Medically, there is a county hospital in my hometown, however the nearest academic healthcare center is over one hour away. The county hospital provides primary care but does not have on-staff specialists available for people in our hometown.

In personally experiencing these hardships, I have been and continue to be inspired to keep pushing across my own academic hurdles and challenges to one day serve society through the integration of public health and business by changing the accessibility, affordability, and delivery of healthcare services. Looking at my future education pursuits, right now, I do not have any concrete plans if I will pursue further education after my MBA/MPH program, but I do know I want to provide a positive impact and actively engage with communities.

Having grown in a disadvantaged background and having personally experienced both income and health inequities, I aspire to use my knowledge gained in my MPH/MBA program to help the communities of which I represent and come from.

Briefly describe your academic journey.

Adesanya: During my formative years, my family lived in a small rural town of 5,000 people. This town is close to my mother’s family, therefore, it was great to grow up near extended family and know the importance of family especially while a child. Through the national A Better Chance foundation, I was provided the opportunity to attend a boarding school for my high school education at The Hockaday School in Dallas, Texas.

Leon: My academic journey has been filled with figuring out the intricacies of this country’s education system. My parents moved me across many different schools in an effort to provide me the education they never had.

Adesanya: While at Hockaday, the transition to an all-girls, urban, boarding school from a small rural, co-educational, public school was not easy. At times, I had to teach myself how to re-analyze certain topics in the classroom, and I had to constantly push myself to re-learn certain material with the help of tutors and professors at Hockaday, but with my constant perseverance and will, I graduated from a top-tier high school and matriculated into The University of Chicago for my undergraduate studies.

Leon: I attended an elite Chicago high school and eventually arrived at WashU as someone who continued to defy the societal expectations set before them.

Adesanya: At UChicago, I was presented with a rigorous and humbling collegiate experience. During college, I worked part-time in a laboratory doing research for not only the better learning of science and healthcare, but also, as part of my student work-study to pay for some of my fees to attend college. Working, being a campus leader, and going to school at the same time allowed me to prioritize my time effectively while remaining engaged in the campus community. Through my tested will and work ethic, I majored in the Biological Sciences with a specialization in Endocrinology, and I minored in Human Rights.

After college, I was accepted to the National Institutes of Health Intramural Research Training Award Fellowship Program in Bethesda, Maryland. Being at the NIH allowed me to have a three-year work-experience while growing both as a student and as a professional. After the NIH, I became motivated to apply to graduate school and pursue a career focused around population and preventative healthcare, therefore, I matriculated to WashU for my MPH program. After the first semester of my MPH program, I was exposed to a wide variety of course topics and began to realize the importance of business concepts in the healthcare industry; therefore, I became motivated to apply to the dual-degree MPH/MBA program.

As a second-year in the three-year program, I am able to see the vital importance of integrating the healthcare and business fields together as it provides me with the enriching opportunity for trans-disciplinary learning.

When looking at the past disadvantages that I have endured, though at times it was challenging to overcome these hurdles, they continue to leave a positive impact on my academic performance and personal outlook on my future goals. From my family’s lack of education, I ensured that I will be resilient throughout my academic journey, so that I can best be equipped to represent and serve the underserved communities that I call home.

Why WashU?

Leon: I chose to come to WashU because of the opportunity to make a difference on campus. The ability to change the campus as a member of many marginalized communities as well as the prestige of Olin Business School made my decision very easy.

Adesanya: After working in DC, I knew I wanted to relocate to the mid-west region of the states as it is closer to home and to my family. Knowing WashU’s strong reputation for equipping students with a well-rounded and strong academic experience, I became inspired to apply to WashU for my graduate school studies. Moreover, at WashU I had the opportunity and flexibility to obtain a dual-degree, MPH/MBA, and with my interest in both fields, I knew that WashU would provide me a unique, enriching graduate school experience.

Not only did the academic reputation and positive student experience motivate me to apply to WashU, but also the city of St. Louis. As a student, I firmly believe the importance of civic engagement on campus and within the surrounding St. Louis community. In many ways St. Louis represents a microcosm of many other American cities, it is a growing and thriving city with opportunity, especially for students.

Being interested in public health and improving the healthcare industry, the cities’ urban environment allows me to learn from the current health disparities and inequities which persist in the city. Thus given my personal ambitions at improving community health, the city of St. Louis also influenced my decision.

As a second-year graduate student, at WashU, I continue to find that not only do I have a well-rounded educational experience in the classrooms, but also, I am able to be active in civic engagement within the metropolitan St. Louis community.




2018 ranking from Bloomberg Businessweek.

The forward momentum continues for WashU Olin Business School with news that our full-time MBA program placed 32nd nationally in Bloomberg Businessweek’s new ranking—up four spots from 2017.

The ranking, released on Thursday, relied on new methodology from previous years and scored Olin highly among US business schools for post-graduate compensation among WashU MBA recipients.

“Olin’s mission focuses on producing and serving business leaders who will change the world—not on rankings,” said Dean Mark P. Taylor. “But when we see a series of rankings confirming our momentum at WashU Olin, we can be gratified that our work is being affirmed and recognized.”

Almost simultaneously, The Princeton Review released its annual ranking of business schools and placed WashU Olin’s full-time MBA in the top five in the country for resources for women. That further reinforced an earlier Financial Times ranking that placed Olin No. 4 globally for MBA programs for women.

These latest results join a series of other recent rankings of business programs around the country and the world, including:

  • The Financial Times global MBA ranking in March, in which Olin jumped 18 places, landing in the world’s top 50.
  • The FT’s global ranking of executive MBA programs last month, which placed our Shanghai Executive MBA sixth in the world—up one from the previous year.
  • The Economist’s 2018 global ranking of MBA programs, also in October, placed Olin 37th in the world, up six places from the previous year.
  • Poets & Quants’ undergraduate ranking in 2017, which placed in the top two in the nation along with Wharton.
  • The TFE Times master of finance rankings placed Olin fourth in the US in 2018.



It sounds like the setup for a bad joke: An artist, an engineer and an economist walk up to a bridge. Instead of delivering a punch line, however, I’ll take this scenario a different direction: Let’s talk about the non-traditional ways Olin has structured business education—some of them in direct response to students.

Consider the artist, whose eye focuses on the bridge’s aesthetic appeal. The engineer admires the integrity of a design that supports hundreds of tons of concrete, steel and people. The economist sees an investment that should yield returns by accelerating the transport of goods, services and labor.

Each has a unique perspective but each considers the other. All three want a sound, attractive, purposeful structure. In that vein, we recognize at Olin that every business student isn’t necessarily interested in a traditional business career. Even further still, every student seeking better business savvy is not destined for a business degree.

For example, we’ve reduced barriers for students approaching business courses from other disciplines, such as students from the Fox School who want to understand marketing better. These are typically rigorous, quantitative courses requiring advanced calculus as a prerequisite. While fully respecting the quantitative nature of our marketing curriculum, we’ve designed a “principles of marketing” course—without the deep quantitative background—for those who don’t need it.

Students themselves drove the introduction of our “business of social impact” minor, which only launched last year, combining faculty expertise from the Brown School and Olin. As BSBA curriculum director Bill Bottom told Student Life last year, “This is an initiative that began from student interest and student research—a group of students…really were quite enthusiastic about their business studies.”

That minor joins the minor in the business of sports, underway for several years, and the newly announced minor in the business of the arts, due to launch next year—along with a course in the economics of entertainment taught by Glenn MacDonald.

We’re even going deeper in the next year—beyond a few courses or a minor—with the introduction of WashU’s first truly joint degree within the university. In 2019, in collaboration with the School of Engineering and Applied Science, we’ll welcome our first students working toward a bachelor’s degree in business and computer science.

“We’ve worked for a year to put this together, and we’ve validated our thinking off of other alumni and corporate partners,” said Steve Malter, Olin’s senior associate dean of undergraduate programs. “This is what the workforce is looking for. This is the future.”

Steve made those comments in the new edition of Olin Business magazine, out now, which dives more deeply into cross-disciplinary business programs than I can here.

As an economist and scholar of renaissance literature myself, you must imagine that I’m a firm believer in interdisciplinary work, combining a broad general curriculum with business education. Real-world problems don’t come neatly packaged. We must look across academic siloes to solve the toughest problems. As leaders, we must be comfortable moving from the highly qualitative to the highly quantitative, using our skills of persuasion, backing our viewpoints with hard-core analysis.

It’s in this context that we speak at Olin about a values-based, data-driven education. That’s why I’m excited by the work Olin has done to reach across disciplines and attract non-traditional business students.