Tag: Full-time MBA



This article was originally published in the 2017 Olin Business Magazine.

Thanks to a generous $1.25 million commitment from The Boeing Company, Olin will continue to provide scholarship support and extracurricular benefits to eligible US military veterans.

“Every day at Boeing, we see the positive impact of the veterans on our teams,” said Shelley Lavender (EMBA ’03), Boeing senior vice president of Strike, Surveillance, and Mobility. “One in seven Boeing employees has served our nation, and brings leadership, commitment, and a unique perspective to the workplace.”

“Our gift to Olin will help ensure today’s veterans have the opportunity to achieve their educational goals and prepare themselves to continue to make an impact in their communities.”

—Shelley Lavender (EMBA ’03), Olin National Council member

Since 2008, Olin has been a full participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program, covering the gap between government funding and Washington University tuition costs for eligible veterans. Boeing’s support of the Olin Veteran Scholarship Fund ensures that Olin can continue to proudly recruit deserving military veterans into its programs.

“The strong leadership qualities that our military veterans bring to the classroom are valued by all Olin students, staff, and faculty,” said Dean Mark Taylor. “The MBA program and qualification give veterans the skills to channel their experience into becoming great business leaders who will change our school, community, and country.”

In addition to veteran scholarships, Boeing will also support the activities of the student-led Olin Veterans Association (OVA), which exists to assist veteran students in their successful transition into the business world. The OVA welcomes veteran students—and their families—to Olin with a three-day “boot camp” that provides an overview of the MBA curriculum. Veteran students are then personally connected to the St. Louis business community through internships, mentor partnerships, employer site visits, and networking events.

On average, Olin enrolls 80 military veterans each year across its graduate degree programs. Olin offers its sincere appreciation to The Boeing Company and its support of military veterans.




Students in the CELect Entrepreneurship Course, held at the T-REx startup accelerator, are sharing their team projects with the Olin Blog. Student team Logan Bolinger, Alex Clouser, Myiah Johnson, and Chad Littrell describe the experience of consulting for their client, TechArtista. 


The co-working space trend has been continuously growing over the past few years. Over the years, consumer interests and expectations of those spaces have evolved and co-working spaces have evolved with them. TechArtista in St. Louis has been at the forefront of developing a unique cultural experience for its customers to address these demands.

TechArtista is not just a co-working space. It is a community of art, culture, and innovation. As TechArtista sets its sights on expanding to a second location, they turned to the CELect program to help execute this task.

During this project, our team has gained great insight on how TechArtista’s differentiated culture creates value for members. When a plan and process are developed around that culture and replicated, it becomes even more valuable. Through our research, we have found that the most successful spaces are the ones that have been able to grow while still remaining true to their brand. TechArtista’s culture is well-positioned for growth. We plan to add value by proposing a plan that helps them leverage and replicate that culture by instilling new processes.

This CELect experience has been valuable because it has demonstrated how effective an actionable plan can be in the execution of a company’s vision. We have also been taught the importance of staying true to the established values and mission of one’s company. The reasons people have for joining an organization and the organization’s own values can be more significant and more catalyzing than what the company actually does.

Guest Bloggers: Logan Bolinger, Law ’18; Alex Clouser, MBA/Architecture ’18; Myiah Johnson, PMBA, ’17; Chad Littrell, PMBA ’18




The below post originally appeared on Net Impact’s CampusGroups page

Upon first steps into the 2017 Net Impact Conference, I was quickly reminded that the community of leaders who infuse social purpose in each business decision is vast and global.

Student chapter leaders from Ecuador spoke about how their partnership with Ferrero Rocher empowered female entrepreneurs to build small businesses and boost local economies. Tech leaders from Silicon Valley stressed the importance of capturing the next industrial revolution of Artificial Intelligence and Virtual Reality for social initiatives. Governing municipalities shared strategies on industry cross-pollination to curb harmful effects of climate change.

Whatever the tailored interest of corporate citizenship or social responsibility, a session was available, inviting a massive exchange of innovative ideas.

The Career Expo further highlighted the surprising participation of diverse stakeholders. Samsung and Monsanto were recruiting for tech and food sustainability pioneers. Pyxera Global and Accenture were seeking social impact-minded consultants. Other exhibitors included the Environmental Defense Fund, Kiva, National Park Service, Shell Corporation, Education Pioneers, Brown-Forman, and more.

Snapping selfies with the Coke Polar Bear!

The weekend was also filled with fun festivities. The conference kick-off was held at the World of Coke, where we mingled with students from over 300 Net Impact chapters and snapped selfies with the Coke Polar Bear. Intermittent ice cream socials kept our fatigue at bay, all while closing the amazing event at a fresh produce market downtown. I went to bed Saturday night with sore feet because I danced the final evening away. I woke up the next morning with an email invitation to pre-register for next year’s Net Impact 2018 event, and I nearly submitted a deposit. If that doesn’t tell you how wonderful the conference was, I don’t know what will.

In closing, I’d like to leave some food for thought for those who didn’t attend Net Impact 2017:

Often times, corporate citizenship or social responsibility is perceived as a pet project delegated to a separate back corner department within a massive corporation. For our fellow Olin colleagues interested in a traditional business venture (Venture Capital, Investment Banking, Strategy Consulting, Brand Management, etc), I implore you to dive more critically into understanding how social purpose can be infused within each action or decision you make as a future executive. Not only are there performance metrics to report for good PR, but there are also evidence-based payoffs for the communities you intentionally consider as partners.

Increasingly, corporations are recognizing the importance of this philosophy, and we shouldn’t be behind as Olin MBAs. Additionally, there are career options beyond Corporate Social Responsibility with salaries to support a decent way of living. Impact Investing, Supply Chain Sustainability, and Social Impact Consulting are growing industries—and ones to consider when choosing your path moving forward.

Guest blogger: Danny (Yea) Lee, MBA/MSW, General Manager, Net Impact




If you have recently made it into a business school, congratulations…and brace yourself. You have now entered the zone of relentless rejections (unless you take the first job offer you receive, in which case have you really MBA-ed?). To each her own, but for those like me, always eager to see what more is out there, this blog is for you.

Your background might not be the right fit, your passport might not be the right color, your scores might not be the right number— what it all boils down to is receiving that letter: ‘Thank you for your interest, unfortunately…..’.

How do you keep your head high and spirits up when the rejections begin to fall denser than snow in St Louis?

After a year of having my pride chopped up by the nth company, I have some thoughts to share. Here goes four ways to get back up after getting knocked down:

Throw a pity party—literally

My friends and I started hosting a ‘pity party’ for whoever received a rejection, which has translated into a lot of partying. The rules are such: the rejected is special for that night – your drinks are fetched for you, food is cooked for you, and you can whine without restriction. Nonetheless, the parties do not see a lot of whining. There is something about empathy that cheers you up faster and helps you go further. There have been times when, after a moment of sadness due to rejection, I was excited about the pity party to come that night. Pity parties made rejection special!

Mourn your loss

However, there are those opportunities which you really, really wanted—and for those, a pity party is just not enough. For those ultra-special rejections, you need to mourn. Set aside your time to mourn: Give yourself two hours, five hours, one night, one day—whatever seems adequate—to be depressed. Binge watch Netflix, sleep for 12 hours, miss a class—do what you need to do to feel the loss. Then, get up and get going again—the next opportunity is waiting for your best effort!

Be grateful for the experience

Its counterintuitive, I know. What I learned, however, is that every rejection made me better. Whether I was rejected before an interview or after (or the worst—after 5 interviews!) every attempt was an experience that taught me ways to improve for the next time. Look at it as a learning opportunity, one that is preparing you to land and succeed in your future job. Always ask for feedback to see where you fell short, then put them in your notebook or throw them out the window—but ask nonetheless. Finally, say thank you to your God or your fate for the experience.

Remember, it’s a numbers game

Shoot for your target, learn from the missed shots, adjust your aim, repeat. Persistence and optimism will pay off. I have seen it happen again and again, to me and to those around me. Also, this is the best time to build your network—and the bigger your network, the broader your lifetime opportunities. So aim for that high number and begin the game.

You have written-off two years of your life to gain new, different, and better experiences in an MBA program—why not make the most of it? The daily rhythm of work life will resume at the end of these two years. Take the chances now, invest in risky propositions, fail fabulously, and fail with finesse.



Note from the editor: It is natural to struggle with the stress of school, work, and life. We want to bring to your attention several campus resources for students:

  • Counseling
  • “Let’s Talk,” a program that provides students with easy access to free, brief, confidential consultations with counselors from Mental Health Services (MHS).
  • Stress-Less @ WashU offers 20-minute, one-on-one consultations designed to help you manage stress intentionally and identify the ways you successfully manage stress as well as your barriers to stress management.
  • Stressbusters is a health initiative that helps WashU students, staff, and faculty rediscover relaxation. 

For more campus resources, be sure to visit the Student Health Services website




Note: Women’s Weekend is Nov. 10-11, 2017. Find information here.

This time last year I was flying to St. Louis for Women’s Weekend! I felt so lucky to have gone to WashU for undergrad about 5 years ago that when I heard about Women’s Weekend, I jumped at the chance to visit campus again.

It sounds cliché, but campus was just as I remembered it: gorgeous fall foliage, students playing ultimate frisbee on Mudd Field… But where I remembered a colossal, cement building from the 70’s (formerly Elliot Hall), now stood Bauer Hall, the new home of the Olin Business School.

No, really—see the atrium in person!

The new building took my breath away. (You should definitely come see it in person!) My eyes immediately rose to the glass ceiling above me, covering the atrium. Flash forward one year and that atrium is my favorite place to study under the skylight or grab coffee with friends between classes. (Thank goodness for the Starbucks on the third floor!) In my first three months as an Olin MBA candidate, Bauer Hall already feels like home.

The Olin Women In Business (OWIB) club got us off to a running start with my first MBA classes. I remember walking through my first case in a practice session at Women’s Weekend. It was quickly followed by a highly sought-after seminar on negotiation taught by Prof. Hillary Anger Elfenbein.

We also heard from amazing Olin alumnae like Dr. Mary Jo Gorman, EMBA ‘96, and Zoe Hillenmeyer, MBA ‘13. Dr. Gorman is a serial entrepreneur who founded Prosper STL, a start up accelerator for women in the St. Louis innovation ecosystem. She’s just one of the many incredible WUSTL alums who visit campus regularly. Zoe Hillenmeyer won the Forte Foundation’s Edie Hunt Award and has since gone on to IBM. At Women’s Weekend, her energy and devotion for Olin was contagious and convinced me that I could make my MBA experience exactly what I wanted it to be at Olin.

Zoe Hillenmeyer, MBA ‘13, presents to attendees at last year’s MBA Women’s Weekend.

With my first semester flying by, I know that is true. I’ve found campus to be welcoming and open to new initiatives, suggestions, and feedback. One recent example is our new OWIB initiative to involve allies on campus. Our aim is to deepen conversations on gender equity and inclusion on campus, and provide more structured ways for allies to get involved. Even before applying, I knew this was a priority for me—and from Day 1, the Olin community has found ways to support and facilitate this goal.

I can’t wait to meet women just like me a year ago at this year’s Women’s Weekend! I’m excited to tell you more about what we’re working on in OWIB and to show you more of my favorite aspects of the Olin experience!

Guest Blogger: Julie Kellman, MBA 2019


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