Tag: Faculty



It’s been a tradition since 1995 and it’s difficult to imagine a better way to kick off the new academic year than our all-school picnic. The Annual Welcome Back Cookout was initiated by Dean Stuart Greenbaum, continued under Dean Mahendra Gupta, and hosted this year for the first time by Dean Mark Taylor Sept. 6. Over one thousand members of the Olin community enjoyed the perennial party under blue skies in the Knight Center’s Reid Courtyard.

Link to post on the history of the Cookout.

According to tradition, the Dean, staff and faculty don aprons and toques to serve the grilled fare to the hungry masses. Chief of Staff Jessica Martin reminded everyone in a tweet that Dean Taylor’s first job as a young man in England was as a hot dog seller! His skills came in handy on the serving line. Thanks to the Aramark staff for grilling and preparing everything on the menu.

Inside the Atrium, student clubs and campus groups representing a wide variety of interests and activities to promote diversity and inclusion shared information at the third Annual Diversity and Inclusion Expo.

Enjoy the photos taken by Jerry Naunheim, Jr. at the events.




Women are on the rise at Olin Business School. Five tenure-track female professors join the faculty this fall in the areas of marketing, organizational behavior, and finance. Olin also welcomes a female visiting professor in economics from Carnegie Mellon. And on the student side of the desk, the MBA Class of 2019 is reporting an uptick in the gender category with 39% women.

“We are pleased to welcome so many talented newcomers to the Olin community,” said Vice Dean Todd Milbourn. “We will all benefit from the talent and knowledge they bring to our educational mission.”

Pictured above left to right, front row: Kang, Huang, Hardin; center row: Perfecto, Liao, organizational behavior postdoc; top row: Scott, Ruttan. Photo by Jerry Naunheim.

Ashley Hardin, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavioral

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of Michigan
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, University of Michigan
  • Research Interests: Quantitative Social Research, Quantitative Social Research, Social Psychology

Xing Huang, Assistant Professor of Finance

  • PhD, Economics, 2013, University of California at Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Assistant Professor of Finance, Michigan State University
  • Research Interests: Behavioral Finance, Asset Pricing, Investor Behavior, Market Efficiency, Information Acquisition, Mutual Funds, Household Finance

Karam Kang, Visiting Professor of Economics

  • PhD, Economics, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin:  Assistant Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Research Interests: Political Economy, Industrial Organization, Environmental Economics

Zhenyu Liao, Postdoc for Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organization, 2017, National University of Singapore
  • Prior to Olin: Research Assistant, National University of Singapore
  • Research Interests: Leadership Behavior and Dynamic, Event Perspective, Interpersonal Interaction

Hannah Perfecto, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Research Interests: Consumer Behavior, Behavioral Decision Theory, Metacognition, Field Experiments, Research Replicability and Reliability

Rachel Ruttan, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organizations, 2017, Northwestern University
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, Management and Organizations, Negotiations, Northwestern University
  • Research Interests: Compassion and Prosocial Behavior, Values and Moral Judgment, Emotion

Sydney Scott, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Marketing and Psychology, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Research Interests: Morality and Consumption, Judgment and Decision Making, Preferences for Natural Products

 




David R. Meyer, Senior Lecturer in Management at Olin, spent a week in Beijing and Xi’an, China this summer lecturing on FinTech, global finance, and China’s One Belt and One Road (OBOR)  initiative. The OBOR program is estimated to include $5 trillion in infrastructure spending across 60-plus countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Africa, according to an article on Quartz written by journalist Zheping Huang. “The “One Belt” part of it refers to the Silk Road Economic Belt,” explains Huang, “while the ‘One Road’ refers to the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road. Jointly, they’re meant to be a revival of the ancient Silk Road trading routes.”

Meyer shared this summary of his talk on OBOR with the Olin blog:

China’s “One belt, one road” initiative has the potential to transform its relations to Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. The linkages are embodied in the Silk Road Economic Belt and New Maritime Silk Road. The initiative is aimed at internal Asian economic development, a process never significantly supported by the countries of Asia or by external actors, especially in Europe and North America.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is the financing vehicle for intergovernmental cooperation, thus serving as enabler of the development process. This seed money supplements even larger sums from Asian governments and private sector actors who will supply most of the capital. Key infrastructure components include railroads, telecommunications, and ports, all to be integrated by sea and by land.

Successful implementation of this initiative will accelerate Asian development and lead to greater internal Eurasian economic integration. Failure of the United States to participate in the AIIB, even as most important world economies are members of the bank, relegates the U.S. to a weak participant in this major global-economic transformation.

David Meyer’s lecture circuit in China this summer:

  • Lecture on “China’s “One belt, one road” initiative,” Capital Normal University, Beijing, China, July 31, 2017
  • Talk on “China as a leader in global FinTech,” FinTech’s Impact on the Real Estate Market in Chinese Financial Centers, American Chamber of Commerce in China, Beijing, China, August 1, 2017
  • Talk on “Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing,” Jones Lang LaSalle, Beijing, China, August 1, 2017
  • Lecture on “China’s financial centers under global uncertainty,” Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, August 3, 2017
  • Dinner with Washington University in St. Louis alumni, Beijing, China, August 3, 2017
  • Talk on “China’s ‘One belt, one road’ initiative: Impact on global financial networks,” Conference on “Silk Road and Urban Development in China and Beyond”, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an, China, August 5-6, 2017.



In the September-October issue of the Harvard Business Review (HBR), Olin researchers identify four principles for designing executive compensation packages that encourage managers to deliver real, sustainable value. The recommendations for refining incentive-based plans stem from ground-breaking research that employed innovative data collection and advanced statistical techniques that revealed flaws and unintended consequences inherent in many pay-for-performance compensation plans.

The research was published in the Journal of Financial Economics earlier this year and received the Olin Award for research with the most potential to impact business in 2015.

Olin authors of the HBR article, “Comp Targets That Work,” include: Radhakrishnan Gopalan, Associate Professor of Finance; John Horn, Senior Lecturer in Economics; and Todd Milbourn,Vice Dean and the Hubert C. & Dorothy R. Moog Professor of Finance.

Harvard Business Review, September-October 2017, Volume 95, Number 5, pp. 102 – 107.

Journal of Financial Economics, 2017, vol. 124, issue 2, 307-330

Check out the Olin research on HBR.




Perhaps you’re a marketing manager eager to launch a new campaign to freshen up an existing product. Or maybe you run a manufacturing operation and believe a second production line would boost the bottom line by increasing output.

In both of these scenarios, you would need to get your ideas past someone in finance.

Todd Milbourn

“The finance function in most organizations is often viewed as the area that always says ‘no’ to resource requests,” said Todd Milbourn, Olin’s vice dean and Hubert C. and Dorothy R. Moog Professor of Finance.

Unfortunately, one way non-financial managers can assure they get a “no” would be to misunderstand what their counterparts in finance actually do.

“It is important to have a perspective on what finance managers are trying to achieve,” Milbourn said. Toward that end, he teaches a daylong seminar aimed directly at the non-financial manager titled, appropriately enough, “Finance for Non-Financial Managers.”

The idea: Bridge the gap in understanding between the finance function and other corporate leaders. “Having this bridge is critical as finance touches everyone in the organization,” he said.

Once managers take the course, Milbourn can’t guarantee participants will always get a “yes” on their requests, “but they’ll know how to better position their own requests to increase their odds of getting funded.”

How non-financial managers can “increase their odds”

  • Become conversant in the language.

    “Managers from outside of finance are often intimidated by the language and terminology of finance,” Milbourn said. “That limits their effectiveness in the organization.” If you can speak the language, you work from a common frame of reference. Milbourn’s course walks participants through a variety of scenarios demystifying concepts such as “shareholder value,” “cost of capital” and “return on investment.”

  • Understand your company’s big picture.

    Know how to read and interpret a balance sheet and other financial statements. Learn how to relate the company’s strategy to the numbers. Milbourn walks participants through the financing, performance, and continuation decision of a company that participants will help finance themselves, putting them in the shoes of actual investors.

  • Understand what finance managers are trying to achieve.

    “The finance function is responsible for allocating resources to a number of initiatives,” Milbourn said. “This balancing act is typically one that cannot say yes to every request.” An appreciation for how finance tracks a company’s historical performance and forecasts its future performance can help you frame your initiatives for the finance manager.

  • Appreciate why sometimes, the answer is “no.”

    You can’t win ’em all. Understanding the components of value creation for shareholders means you may learn how to pick your battles when you have an idea. “This seminar will give participants a sense of the ‘portfolio problem’ financial managers face,” Milbourn said.

The next session of “Finance for Non-Financial Managers” is set for Sept. 19, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Knight Center. Visit Olin’s website for registration information and for our other executive education offerings.

Guest blogger: Kurt Greenbaum


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