Tag: Building Olin



Last month, the Impact Investing Symposium returned to Olin. In it’s second year, the Symposium brought together professionals in finance, foundations, social justice, and government to discuss the potential for impact investing in St. Louis. What a turnout: 180 attendees across industries and experience of impact investing.

The afternoon began with a keynote interview with Nicole Hudson, exploring the work of the Ferguson Commission and what types of projects are ripe for investment in St. Louis. The Ferguson Commission was crucial in advancing a community understanding, response, action plan and forward steps after the shooting of Michael Brown in North St. Louis. Like all community action, the initiative needed tangible measures for impact as well as buy-in from an entire community, across backgrounds and city/county lines.

The necessity for common language and common ground is paramount for impact investing: we need voices of the under-served, perspectives of the financiers, and mediators who can find the common goals. That’s what makes the Impact Investing Symposium unique. It’s a rarity to get folks of these industries in the same room, having a conversation, exchanging dialogue, looking forward.

This year’s panel expanded on a discussion of last year: why impact investing is imminent. Mike Eggleston shared community survey results from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis while David Desai-Ramirez articulated ways for individuals and institutions to take direct action in impact investing: speak with a conduit social enterprise like IFF or Justine PETERSEN. Symposium veteran Tim Coffin shared the traditional finance mechanisms in place for investing with impact and Heather Cameron contributed macro level understandings of community impact. Jake Barnett, mediator, delivered a final parting challenge: “integrity is the proximity of one’s values to their actions.”

The conversation on changing mindsets and redefining “return” will continue – but the Symposium is ready for it’s next iteration: what are actionable steps? How can Olin be at the forefront of impact investing? Where should St. Louis focus it’s resources, intellect, and innovation?

We left the Symposium with the following directive: what projects can we support as individuals, investors, and community members? Have ideas? Be in touch – we’re ready to move forward: impactinvest@wustl.edu.

The Impact Investing Symposium was founded, organized and implemented by socially-minded Olin MBA students. We intend to keep this mission alive at Olin: bridging finance and social impact. To support this initiative or make further inquiry regarding potential future sponsorship, please contact impactinvest@wustl.edu. This event was sponsored by U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation and hosted by Net Impact, the Weston Career Center, and Olin Business School.




In part two of the 2016 Rosenblatt Lecture series, Jan Van Mieghem, the Harold L. Stuart Professor of Managerial Economics and Professor of Operations Management, Managerial Economics & Decision Sciences at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Business, explains how the prioritization of individual preferences (i.e., the way in which tasks are performed by healthcare professionals) can reduce throughput, or the number of patients serviced.  This lack of emphasis on collaboration and multitasking can result in decreased efficiency and, therefore, increased costs in the healthcare process.   Read full article  •  Watch part I


The Rosenblatt Lecture series was established in 2003 to honor the memory of Meir J. Rosenblatt, who taught from 1987 to 2001 at Olin Business School as the Myron Northrop Distinguished Professor of Operations and Manufacturing Management. A leader among faculty, Rosenblatt often won the Teacher of the Year award at Olin and authored the book “Five Times and Still Kicking: A Life with Cancer,” having battled cancer multiple times throughout his life.

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It was St. Patrick’s Day 2014. First day of classes after Spring Break. Bleary-eyed students got an amazing wake-up call when they entered Knight Hall and Bauer Hall for the first time.  “Wow,” “Cool,” “Amazing,” were just a few of the exclamations of delight uttered as students stepped into the five-story high glass Atrium for the first time.

©Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.

The beautiful wood surfaces of the Frick Forum, curved glass banisters, and natural light streaming in through thousands of transparent panels surrounding the Atrium made everyone stop and look up.

Exploring the new classrooms, study rooms, Emerson Auditorium, the stairwells, and elevators was like a huge treasure hunt with surprises behind each door.

©Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.

Two years later, the newness has not worn off. The Atrium is still sparkly and awe-inspiring when the sun shines or it rains or snows, day or night. Watching campus tours parade through the Atrium, I always smile as the visitors look up and and around  and say, “Wow, this is an amazing place!” just like we did on March 17, 2014.

©Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.

 

 

CATEGORY: Student Life



Staging an event for 1,200+ guests, 90 vendors, with non-stop food and drink takes great planning and efficient staffing and the Aramark staff carried it off flawlessly for last fall’s Startup Connection held on all three levels of the Knight Hall-Bauer Hall Atrium. The event was recognized by the International Special Events Society – St. Louis Chapter as a finalist for the Best Logistical Event for 2015 at the annual Louie Awards, March 4.

Aramark, the company that provides facilities management and food services to Olin, organizes hundreds of events each year in our four buildings.

Gene Castellitto, Aramark General Manager for The Charles F. Knight Executive Education & Conference Center said Startup Connection was one of the biggest events in the new buildings since the Dedication Ceremony two years ago:

“This event involved removing all of the public area furniture from Knight and Bauer Halls, and re-setting the two buildings for 90 vendors and 1200 + guests. I want to recognize Alisa Kelly, Conference Planning Manager, for the countless hours and detailed coordination efforts required to make this event a success.  In addition, I would like to thank John Schuler, Brian Blankenship, Donnie Zavala, and Joe Banstetter for their contributions in making this event a success.”

Link to 60 second video of the event here.

In 2015, The Knight Center won a Louie award for the Best Overall On-Premise Catered Event for the Scholars in Business dinner held in the Atrium.

CATEGORY: News



Five teams from business schools around the country competed for the $10,000 first prize in the first annual Monsanto-Olin Case Competition on February 12. The competition was designed to give graduate students an opportunity to provide innovative business solutions to a case study written about Monsanto’s seed corn supply chain. Participating teams represented:Texas Christian University, Rollins College, the University of Missouri, Pennsylvania State University, and Washington University.

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