Author: Olin in the Media

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About Olin in the Media

Posting the latest on Olin student, alumni, faculty, and staff stories from business and news outlets locally, nationally, and around the world.


Olin Business School’s Executive MBA program in partnership with Fudan University in China is number seven in the 2017 Financial Times’ annual ranking of the world’s top 100 EMBA programs.This survey marks the sixth consecutive year that the Olin-Fudan EMBA has been ranked in the FT’s top ten global programs.

Alumni of the Olin-Fudan program reported gains in the important areas of salary increase, career progress, and work experience. Olin-Fudan EMBA graduates are among the top earners of the schools in the ranking with an average salary of $360,250, the third highest globally.

“Olin’s partnership with Fudan University pioneered the executive MBA in China in 2002 and has consistently been a leader,” said Mark Taylor, dean of Olin Business School. “The large number of top American and European business schools that have followed us to Asia in recent years are a testament to our successful program and our outstanding alumni who have propelled their global careers to new heights after earning the Olin-Fudan EMBA degree.”

The Financial Times ranking is based on two surveys: one of business schools and one of their alumni who graduated in 2014. Criteria in 16 categories are weighted for the overall ranking. For more on the FT ranking methodology and details of this year’s survey, link to the Oct. 16 edition of the FT.




Razzy Ghomeshi, BSBA’09, is featured as a rising star of Wall Street on a list published by Business Insider. Ghomeshi is one of 18 top Wall Streeters in sales and trading on the list – and all of the young execs are under 35. Ghomeshi, 30, is head of investment grade trading in the US for RBC Capital Markets.

Ghomeshi began his career at RBC when he graduated from Olin. He majored in finance, international business, and marketing. Ghomeshi has been recognized three times as one of the “Most Helpful Traders” in investment-grade credit, according to Greenwich Associates.

Congratulations, Razzy, for this well deserved recognition and best wishes for continued success in your career!




Entrepreneurship

Arch Grants is practically synonymous with the St. Louis startup community. And Ben Burke, MBA’14, director of entrepreneurship at Arch Grants, is at the center of that synergy. He orchestrates many of the connections that fuel the burgeoning startup community here that is attracting entrepreneurs from around the world.

Burke joined Arch Grants in 2013, a year after it was launched as a nonprofit organization dedicated to “building a new economy by providing $50,000 equity-free grants and pro bono support services to entrepreneurs who locate their early-stage businesses in St. Louis.”

Through its competitive Global Startup Competition, Arch Grants attracts innovative entrepreneurs to the St. Louis region with the goal of keeping their startups here to grow a new economy of  innovative companies.

According to its 2016 Annual Report, Arch Grants has awarded $5.2 million in equity free grants to 96 startup businesses in St. Louis that, in turn, have created more than 1,000 jobs in since 2012, and generated over $51 million in economic output for the St. Louis region in 2016 alone. (source: Arch Grants Annual Report.)

Ben Burke is the guest on the latest episode of STL Community Cast, a podcast that created by Drew Davis who talks with innovative leaders in St. Louis. Give it a listen or check it out on Soundcloud.

 

 

 


SAN JOSE, CALIF.  – The Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) today bestowed the fifth annual AdvaMed Lifetime Achievement Award to former Beckman Coulter CEO and Chairman John P. “Jack” Wareham, for his contributions to improving patient care and health care system efficiency through innovation of clinical laboratory testing.

Jack Wareham

“Jack is one of the unsung heroes of modern medical practice,” said Scott Whitaker, president and CEO of AdvaMed. “His work at Beckman Coulter helped pioneer automation in the clinical laboratory and transformed the diagnostic industry as a result. Millions of people every year benefit from his vision of more accurate and efficient clinical testing, and we are honored to present Jack this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award.”Wareham began his career in the life sciences after earning a bachelor’s of science degree in pharmacy from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He worked as a pharmacist while earning an MBA from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and worked his way through the ranks of the pharmaceutical company, Smith, Kline and French.

SmithKline acquired laboratory instruments company Beckman Instruments in 1981 in a $1 billion deal. Beginning in 1984, Wareham held several senior management positions in the new division. In 1993, he was named president and COO of Beckman Instruments, which was spun off as a separate, public company in 1989.

As COO, he was the driving force behind the successful merger in 1997 of Beckman Instruments with Coulter Corporation, the leading manufacturer of systems for blood and other cell analysis. In 1998, he was named CEO of the newly formed Beckman Coulter.

Today Beckman Coulter is recognized as a powerhouse in the diagnostics industry, developing and marketing instruments, chemistries, software and supplies to simplify and automate laboratory operations, and ultimately save patient’s lives.

After retiring from Beckman Coulter in 2005, Wareham has continued to share his vision and business expertise, helping to guide a number of diverse enterprises as a director for medtech companies including Steris, ResMed, Accuray and Greatbatch

Wareham also served as chairman of the Board for AdvaMed in 2000, helping lead the association in a new direction for the 21st Century as it rebranded from the Health Industry Manufacturer’s Association.

“I am proud to be honored by my peers with this incredible award,” said Wareham, “and I gratefully accept on behalf of all the wonderful people I’ve worked with over the years who are dedicated to improving patient care.”

AdvaMed’s Lifetime Achievement Award highlights the accomplishments of pioneers in the medical technology sector whose contributions have had a significant impact on patients’ lives and the industry as an essential part of America’s economy. The award was presented during The MedTech Conference powered by AdvaMed at the San Jose Convention Center.

AdvaMed member companies produce the medical devices, diagnostic products and health information systems that are transforming health care through earlier disease detection, less invasive procedures and more effective treatments. AdvaMed members range from the largest to the smallest medical technology innovators and companies.




In an op-ed published by the Houston Business Journal, Panos Kouvelis writes about the crucial role supply chain managers play in recovery from natural disasters like the recent Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Kouvelis is Director of The Boeing Center for Supply Chain Innovation and Emerson Distinguished Professor of Operations and Manufacturing Management. Excerpts from his opinion are below, link to the article here.

Panos Kouvelis

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma provide another stunning reminder of how far such disasters can reach. It is no exaggeration to say that, in the weeks and months to come, the whole world will feel their after-effects.

For supply chain managers confronting a disruption, the first-level reaction is to consider which customers, products, facilities, employees and suppliers are at the greatest risk. What is the overall revenue exposure, and how long it will take to recover?

As any supply chain manager understands all too well, it is not necessarily the original event, but the ripple effects that cause major disruptions. The Japanese earthquake triggered a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Hurricane Harvey caused a series of small explosions at the Arkema chemical plant in Crosby, Texas.

And when supply chains are tight, any hiccup can drive supply-demand imbalances. Harvey shuttered 60 percent of U.S. ethylene capacity. Ethylene and its derivatives are used to produce plastics, antifreeze, house paint, vinyl products and rubber. Shortages will ripple across these markets for months.

Photo: U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Patrick Kelley


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