Author: Nate Quest

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About Nate Quest

I began serving as the Academic Advisor for the Master of Science in Finance (MSF) program at Olin in February 2015. Prior to this, I served as Administrative Coordinator for the Specialized Masters Programs at Olin, including Masters degrees in Accounting, Customer Analytics, Finance, and Supply Chain Management. When I'm not in the office, I'm usually spending time with my lovely wife and three kids, or running. I'm a 2005 graduate of Washington University, with degrees in Economics and Religious Studies.


The Boeing Center for Supply Chain Innovation (BCSCI), in collaboration with Monsanto, has once again produced a challenging case in global supply chain and technology management for the return of the Monsanto Olin Case Competition on February 8, 2018.

Seven teams have been selected as finalists, representing institutions from across the U.S. and Canada, including:

  • Arizona State University
  • University of Cincinnati
  • Ivey Business School
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • MIT
  • Texas Christian University
  • Washington University in St. Louis

We are proud to announce that Lin Kang (Team Captain), Himanshu Aggarwal, Tyler Daniel, and Jamie Yue, all MBA 2018, will represent Olin in the case competition.

Tyler Daniel, Himanshu Aggarwal, Jamie Yue, and Lin Kang

For the final round held at WashU’s campus in February, the seven teams will each make 15-minute presentations and have a ten-minute question and answer period responding to a case on product rollover strategies, production and inventory planning challenges in seed corn supply chains.

The five judges—all from Monsanto and Olin—will be looking for depth of analysis and originality of thought. As a “warm-up,” the student teams will tour Monsanto’s campus the day before the case competition and be treated to a Monsanto panel and a reception to meet, learn more, and network.

Olin is looking forward to a great experience for the participants and wish all the teams good luck! The winners will receive $10,000 for first prize, $5,000 for second prize, and $2,500 for third prize.




The Supply Chain and Operation Symposium on November 29 brought powerhouse panelists to Olin Business School. The student event was coordinated by Olin’s Supply Chain and Operations Association (SCOPA) and sponsored by the Boeing Center for Supply Chain Innovation (BCSCI) and Olin’s Weston Career Center.

The four panelists, exceptional leaders from World Wide Technology, Monsanto, Eaton, and Caleres, described how the work they do contributes to their organization’s value chain. Students were encouraged to be courageous, innovative, vulnerable, and to stay humble. It was a tremendous learning opportunity for all who attended!

About the panel

Mike Taylor, Vice President of Information Technology, World Wide Technology

As Vice President of Information Technology, Mike is responsible for all information technology functions that include business applications, IT governance, architecture, infrastructure, and core Advanced Technology Center operations.

Marcelle Pires, Global Supply Chain Director, Monsanto

Marcelle is a 18-year employee with Monsanto Company. She joined the company in Brazil and has worked primarily in Manufacturing and Supply Chain Operations, including roles as Manufacturing Manager, Supply Chain Manager in the Chemistry and Seeds businesses.

Carlos Alberto Valdez, Director of Operations for B-Line, Eaton

Carlos has worked in the industry for 23 years and currently is responsible for Eaton B-Line Business Operations, consisting of seven manufacturing sites in the U.S. and Canada, in addition to a site in Saudi Arabia.

Natacha Alpert, Innovation Lead, Caleres

Natacha has been in the footwear and apparel industry, working creatively for iconic brands, for the past 14 years. She is currently the innovation lead at CALERES, serving 9 of their brands in the corporate portfolio. She previously held global positions at Nine West, Dr. Marten’s, Miras3D, Timberland, and Reebok.

Guest Blogger: Laura Hollabaugh, Academic Advisor, Graduate Programs




What happens when the sustainable agriculture company Monsanto and Washington University’s Olin Business School partner to create an exceptional developmental experience for graduate business students?

You get the Monsanto Olin Case Competition (MOCC), an opportunity for ten teams from across the country to come together for the third annual competition on Feb. 8, 2018. Through an affiliation with Olin’s Boeing Center for Supply Chain Innovation (BCSCI), this year’s case will challenge participating teams to present thoughtful and strategic solutions to a global supply chain and technology management problem. The student leadership from Olin’s Supply Chain & Operations Association (SCOPA) has already proven invaluable.

Participation in the case competition will include a tour of Monsanto’s Chesterfield campus, a panel, and a reception on Tuesday, February 7—a great precursor to the next day’s competition. Prize money will be $10,000 for first place, $5,000 for second place; and $2,500 for third place.

Teams have until December 11, 2017, to register and submit Round 1 materials. For more information, go to www.olin.wustl.edu/mocc. For questions, contact MOCC@wustl.edu.


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New and returning Specialized Masters Programs (SMP) students wrapped up a busy week of classes and seminars by cutting loose at Ballpark Village on Friday evening, Sept.22. The annual event, hosted by the Graduate Programs office and the SMP Council, drew more than 200 students to fill the second floor of the Budweiser Brew House.

New SMP students got to meet some of the students returning for their third and final semester, and the new SMP Council took the opportunity to introduce themselves to the cohorts by staffing the registration table.

Students enjoyed local favorites like toasted ravioli, alongside classic fare of sliders, chicken wings, egg rolls, and more. Most students stayed to enjoy Ballpark Village after the event ended when the space opened to the public. The dramatic growth in the SMP student population has allowed for–and indeed, necessitated–expansion from event spaces on the Delmar Loop to the larger venues offered by Ballpark Village.




May 26 marked the last day of the Global Master of Finance (GMF) immersion courses, and the DC portion will conclude with a full introduction and understanding of the role of Congress in financial regulation.

Our first speaker was a former member of congress; he took a unique angle – from a member’s point of view – to talk about how Congress gets involved in financial services. He started by describing a typical day of a member of Congress, to let us know how they look at financial institutions. It is surprising to know that for twenty years, he worked no less than sixty hours a week, and many times eighty or even a hundred hours. A member of Congress must try to be familiar with virtually every area that impacts their constituents, and spends most of the time meeting with constituents, going to committees, and getting involved in discussions in his or her areas of expertise.

Our speaker then talked about how Congress gets involved in financial services, which is primarily reactively. This means Congress usually does not get involved in financial services until there is some kind of crisis. Our speaker took the 2008 crash as an example, to illustrate how Congress and the Fed responded to maintain economic stability and set up a stimulus policy to resolve the world-wide panic when confronted with a financial crisis. We learned that for most members of Congress, regardless of party, they share a general philosophy to let the markets be markets, let people have the freedom to invest, and then try to set up some kind of safeguards to protect investors so that no one can take advantage of it.

Next, we took a tour of the US Capitol with a former US Congressman. He was a patient and knowledgeable person. During the tour, he introduced the history and some fun stories of the Capitol to us. He was also able to share some insights from a former Congressman’s perspective and an insider’s view.

We visited the original location of the Supreme Court, the Statuary Hall, the House Chamber, and the Speaker’s Lobby. The Statuary Hall, which is the Old House Chamber, displays statues of famous Americans. The most memorable part of the tour was the House Chamber. We were told to leave our bags, notebooks, phones, and other prohibited items in the Speakers’ Lobby before entering the House Chamber. The House Chamber is filled with rows of chairs. Our tour guide told us that the House of Representatives conducts legislative activities here. He also showed us his Congressman card that can be used to vote. When he voted, he would insert his card in a machine, and then would press the button of yes of no. Another interesting point is that in the House Chamber, which is part of the legislative branch, the President of United States can only enter via invitation, and does not sit in the highest chair. Instead, the President sits below the Speaker of the House within the House Chamber.

Then we went beneath the building. There was a very intriguing subway waiting for us, which took us to one of the Capitol office buildings. Our last speaker in Washington had experience in various political and financial areas. He has worked for a private equity firm, a hedge fund, and has participated in many kinds of economic policy settings. His experience itself is a good pattern that teaches us if someone in the finance industry would want to go further, finance knowledge is far from enough.

The speaker started from a very new view in the finance area: that the primary changes in finance always come from progress in technology. He stated that we can really feel the influences from blockchain and other kinds of FinTech rising to the next level. The young generations should pay more attention to it and explore more possibilities in this field. He then spoke about regulation.

Over-regulation is now a hot topic, but he emphasized that over-regulation is at least good for common consumers. He also mentioned that the Fed, SEC, and other regulatory authorities are trying to shorten the regulatory lag, which can seriously impact the effect of policies. One more interesting thing he told us is that any authority still can be wrong. He told us that one high-level person in the Fed considered the mortgage market healthy just before the global financial crisis. What we learned from this speaker is that although we are young now, we should always keep questioning what authorities say and do, and maintain the courage to challenge their voices, and that will help us to contribute more in the finance industry in the future.

We the GMF 2017 cohort are very grateful to have had the chance to learn about the US financial markets and regulation with the insightful speeches from the distinguished practitioners and field trips. This two week immersion course will definitely give us a holistic and deeper understanding of today’s global financial markets and will set the tone for our future studies and careers after graduation.

Guest Bloggers: Shuying (Sunnie) Li, Kedi (Kelly) Ni, Yao (Deborah) Shan, Lei (Isaac) Xia (GMF 2017)

This is a series of blogs chronicling the experiences of 42 Global Master of Finance (GMF) dual degree students during their two week immersion course in New York and Washington, DC. Each blog will be written by a small subset of students during their experience. Names of speakers and presenters at firms are anonymous at the request of the firms and course organizers.


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