Author: Melody Walker

avatar

About Melody Walker

My nickname around the office is "Scoops" because I always have the latest news from the halls of Simon, Starbucks, or the STL startup scene. Thanks to staff and student bloggers, I'm not alone in reporting on the Olin community here on the Blog. Don't be shy, post a comment or send us your story. New bloggers always welcome!


It’s time to clean house and get rid of all those old devices that don’t work and all the old bills and documents crowding your closets. Bag it up and bring it to the Electronic Recycling & Confidential Paper Shredding Event, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.

Due to the success of last spring’s e-cycling and shredding event, the Aramark sustainability team is hosting the event again. Drop off that old desktop computer, phone, and confidential paperwork in front of the Knight Center and Knight Hall on Snow Way Drive, Oct. 25, 7 a.m. – 11 a.m.

“An estimated 175 contributors dropped off approximately 3,500 pounds of paper and 5,000 pounds of electronic items in March,” said Gene Castellitto, Aramark General Manager of The Charles F. Knight Executive Education & Conference Center. “Our sustainability team, in conjunction with the Washington University Office of Sustainability and IT Information and Security Office, is proud to host another event.”

Castellitto adds that university certified vendors will shred any paper on site, and will securely and safely recycle any electronic items. There are some fees for electronic items; see below.




It’s Campus Sustainability Month and there are so many events planned we can’t list them all here. So click on the hyperlinks and find out how to enjoy alternative transportation, bike tours, lectures, and more.

Here are two events happening this weekend:

 METROLINK RIDE AND FOOD ROOF TOUR
Saturday,  October 7, 9:15am-12pm, Meet at Brookings Hall Arch

BIKE RIDE TO GROVEFEST WITH THE OUTING CLUB
Saturday October 7, Meet at 3pm on Forsyth in front of Hillman Hall, return at 6pm

More Campus Sustainability Month Events:

Any updates related to these events will be posted on this webpage, so keep an eye open on the calendar and get ready to participate! If you wish to volunteer your time to make Campus Sustainability Month a success, please email sustainability@wustl.edu.

We hope you will join us as we celebrate sustainability during #CampusSustainabilityMonth and throughout the rest of the year!




Washington University Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton has announced that he will retire after the University conducts a national search for his successor.

An email message from the Chancellor to the University community on Oct. 6, stated:

Today, during our October meeting, I shared with the university’s Board of Trustees my intention to transition out of the chancellorship after completion of our Leading Together campaign. It is an honor to serve the university and I am very proud of what we have accomplished together over the past 22 years.

With so much to do and so much opportunity ahead of us, we will not be slowing down. I am determined to maintain our momentum. Most importantly, I want to ensure the final nine months of the campaign are successful. But, this is an appropriate time to begin to plan for my transition and I wanted to share the news with all of you who are part of a very special community….

I am grateful for the privilege of being your chancellor and look forward to this next phase of our work.

The email also contained Wrighton’s statement to the board and a link to the official announcement from the University. It states that Wrighton will “conclude his term as Chancellor, effective no later than July 1, 2019.”

Wrighton was inaugurated as chancellor Oct. 6, 1995, 22 years ago today. WashU’s The Source published a tour of the Chancellor’s office today on its website.

University accomplishments during Chancellor Wrighton’s tenure include a more than two-fold increase in undergraduate applications, more than 300 new endowed professorships for faculty, a redesigned Arts & Sciences curriculum, newly created programs in biomedical engineering, public health, American culture studies, and completion of more than 50 new buildings for Arts & Sciences, business, design and visual arts, engineering, law, medicine, social work and residential life.

Two major, multiyear fundraising initiatives were conducted during Chancellor Wrighton’s tenure. In 1998 the university publicly launched a billion-dollar campaign to build resources for student scholarships, professorships, other endowed program support and new buildings. The campaign continued through 2004, surpassed its goal, and raised more than $1.55 billion.

The current capital campaign – Leading Together: The Campaign for Washington University – will build on the university’s strong history and further evolve its global leadership by focusing on strengthening the university’s impact in four key areas: preparing the leaders of tomorrow, advancing human health, inspiring innovation and entrepreneurship, and enhancing the quality of life. The Leading Together Campaign was publicly launched in October 2012 and will conclude in June 2018. The Campaign has already exceeded its $2.5 billion goal with more than $2.7 billion realized.

Born in Jacksonville, Florida in 1949, Wrighton earned his BS degree with honors in chemistry from Florida State University in 1969. While at Florida State, he studied under Professor Jack Saltiel and upon graduation received the Monsanto Chemistry Award for outstanding research. He did his graduate work at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) under Professors Harry B. Gray and George S. Hammond, receiving his PhD there in 1972. His doctoral dissertation was on “Photoprocesses in Metal-Containing Molecules.” Based on his research accomplishments, Wrighton was named the first recipient of the Herbert Newby McCoy Award at Caltech.

Wrighton started his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1972 as assistant professor of chemistry. He was appointed associate professor in 1976 and professor in 1977. From 1981 until 1989 he held the Frederick G. Keyes Chair in Chemistry. In 1989 he was appointed the first holder of the Ciba-Geigy Chair in Chemistry. He was Head of the Department of Chemistry from 1987-90 and became Provost of MIT in 1990, a post he held until the summer of 1995.

Link to complete bio.

Photo credit: The Source, WUSTL photos




Hungry for the latest trends facing the food business? Don’t miss the Business of Food event taking place Thursday, Oct. 5, 7:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. at Emerson Auditorium in Knight Hall. It’s part of the St. Louis Leadership Perspectives in partnership with the St. Louis Business Journal and Olin’s Executive Education programs. There is no cost to attend, but registration is required. Click Here to Register!

Event Details:

7:15 a.m. – 8 a.m. Networking and Chick-fil-A Breakfast

8 a.m. – 9 a.m. Panel Discussion

​The Business of Food Panelists: 

Eric Benting, Owner/Operator, Chick-fil-A; EMBA Alumnus

Gail Kitsis, Owner and Founder, Crazy Bowls and Wraps

Oliver Kremer, Owner and Founder, Dos Toros Taqueria; BSBA Alumnus

Toby Warticovschi, Partner, Millstone Capital Advisors, LLC; Owner, Lion’s Choice Restaurants; EMBA Alumnus

Moderator: Lauren DeSantis-Then, Founder, Capital Cooking TV and Blog; Attorney, Polsinelli

Managing earnings and same-store revenue expectations, supply chain challenges, talent acquisition and retention, marketing, and reputation management in the age of social media – how single restaurants and regional and national chains operate is more complex than ever before.

Professionals involved in the business of food find themselves wrestling with a list of competing priorities.  Emerging technologies and the demand for a better mobile experience is at the top of the list. Changes in consumer preferences and expectations, along with health movements, food safety and FDA requirements, are forcing a new dialogue and menu choices.

The fight for a larger share of stomach has never been greater!  Join us as we cook up some lively discussion with owners, a franchisee and a food blogger – and engage in the business of food.

 Photo: Oliver and Leo Kremer of Dos Toros taquerias in NYC.

 




“There’s this myth out there that women aren’t as good negotiators as men,” says Hillary Anger Elfenbein. “And I want to try to shatter that myth.”

Elfenbein, The John and Ellen Wallace Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior, shatters that myth on a regular basis in the Olin courses she teaches on negotiation. On October 18, she will share highlights from her research on gender differences in negotiation and how women can confidently approach the process in a free webinar, “Women at the Negotiation Table,” sponsored by Olin’s Executive MBA program.

“There are differences in the way women approach negotiations versus men and there are often differences in outcomes, but these differences can be overcome, especially with a few very simple changes in frame of reference that are easy to accomplish without necessarily changing one’s overall personality,” explains Elfenbein.

Elfenbein also advocates for a broader definition of negotiation. It’s much more than haggling over the price of a new car or a promotion, or a new job’s salary. While those are extremely important negotiations, Elfenbein says it’s helpful to recognize that we are actually negotiating all the time, and can improve our techniques on a daily basis.

“The most accepted scholarly definition of negotiation is that it’s a mutual decision-making process to allocate scarce resources. And if you take that definition seriously enough, we’re negotiating constantly. This definition is as true for who does the dishes and who stays late on the weekends. Who has to come in to the office, what roles are you going to take, how are you dividing labor in your team. All of those things are a negotiation, just as much as the price of a car.”

Register today for “Women at the Negotiation Table” on Oct. 18

Research shows that men and women may end up with similar outcomes in a negotiation, but they often get there in different ways. In very broad generalities, women are more apt to find trade-offs and compatibilities in the process, while men tend to engage in more assertive haggling. Elfenbein says these kinds of stereotypes can create psychological obstacles for women.

“If you survey people after a negotiation, and ask people to self-report their scores, women will, by and large, self-report that they did worse. That feeling matters, because even though you might say, ‘It’s all in your head,’ well, a lot of things are in our heads, and that makes them real, that makes them consequential. If you go through life feeling like you’re not good at something, you’re going to avoid doing it. And if you don’t enter a negotiation, then you’re not going to be able to advocate for your needs.”

In her Olin courses and the upcoming webinar, Elfenbein shares ways for women to shift their frame of reference and attitude when approaching negotiation. It takes practice, but they can be changed and make a difference in how to negotiate with confidence and success.

“The kinds of techniques that you learn in the negotiations workshop are as applicable outside of work as they are at work. I like to think that the tools that we that we teach here are useful and adaptable to negotiations of all types.”

Hillary Anger Elfenbein has been a business school professor at the Olin School of Washington University in St. Louis since 2008. She holds a PhD in Organizational Behavior, a Master’s degree in Statistics, and undergraduate degrees in Physics and Sanskrit, all from Harvard University.

Examples of Dr. Elfenbein’s research on negotiation:

Elfenbein, H. A., Curhan, J. R., Eisenkraft, N., Shirako, A., & Baccaro, L. (2008). Are some negotiators better than others? Individual differences in bargaining outcomes. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 1463–1475.

Curhan, J. R., Elfenbein, H. A., & Kilduff, G. J. (2009). Getting off on the right foot: Subjective value versus economic value in predicting longitudinal job outcomes from job offer negotiations. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94, 524-534.

Curhan, J. R., Elfenbein, H. A., & Eisenkraft, N. (2010). The objective value of subjective value: A multi-round negotiation study.  Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40, 690-709.


Olin Business School Blog Olin Business School Blog