Tag: scholarships



This article was originally published in the 2017 Olin Business Magazine.

Merry, MBA ’82, and Jim Mosbacher have committed $500,000 to support annual and endowed scholarships for Olin Business School students. Their gift was structured as a challenge to attract new Eliot Society Members, and it matched new Eliot Society membership gifts at any level. Merry is currently president of the William Greenleaf Eliot Society, and she and Jim are both partners at St. Louis-based investment firm Edward Jones.

“We’re committed to making education affordable for all students. As Eliot Society members, our gift not only supports scholarships for talented students, but also world-class faculty, innovative research, and outstanding academic programs,” Merry said. The
Mosbachers have been significant supporters of Olin and the Eliot Society since 1983. They are also role models and mentors for more than 200 WashU alumni—more than half from Olin—who are employed at Edward Jones. Like the Mosbachers, dozens of alumni working at Edward Jones volunteer their time and expertise in Olin classrooms as guest speakers and with students through mentoring programs and through their financial support for the Edward Jones Scholarship Program.

Merry Mosbacher was honored with a Distinguished Alumni Award in 2012. She was recognized as a St. Louis Woman of Achievement in 2013 and has been named one of the most influential businesswomen in St. Louis by the St. Louis Business Journal. Today, as principal of Insurance and Annuity Products at Edward Jones, she oversees more than $6 billion in sales a year.

Learn more about ways you can help Olin continue to be a world-class institution for business education.




This article was originally published in the 2017 Olin Business Magazine.

Sid Guller, BSBA ’47, worked for a year to save enough money to pay for his freshman year at Washington University. “Tuition was $125 a semester, plus books, plus an activity ticket,” Guller recalled. “I think the activity ticket was $15.” In order to stay in college, Guller worked one and sometimes two jobs during the semester and full time during the summer break. He wanted to study engineering like his older brother Harold, BSEN ’39, but soon realized he was better suited for business.

Today, Guller is chairman of St. Louis-based Essex Industries, the privately held defense and aerospace manufacturing company he founded with his brother in their parents’ basement in 1946. Their first product, an F-214 Radio Noise Filter, was the first of many aircraft controls and components that led to the company’s participation in virtually every major military and commercial aerospace program for the past 70 years.

Sid Guller recently committed $500,000 for the Bobbi Guller Memorial Scholarship he established at Olin Business School in 2011 in memory of his wife, Bobette, who died in 2010. He also pledged $300,000 through the Guller Foundation for the Guller Joint Program Scholarship benefiting students in the 3/2 program, which gives undergraduates the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in engineering and an MBA in five years.

The Guller Foundation—the charitable arm of Essex Industries—has supported the 3/2 program since 1986.

“There are many intelligent and skilled young people who don’t have the means to attend Washington University,” Guller says. “I support scholarships so they can receive an excellent education, then graduate and apply what they learned to benefit society.”

A tireless champion of Washington University, Sid Guller has served on the Olin Business School National Council since 2000 and the Olin Capital Resources Committee since 1999. He has supported multiple annual and endowed scholarships and provided funds to name two spaces at the business school, the Bobbi and Sidney Guller Lounge in the Knight Center and the Guller Classroom in Bauer Hall.

He has received Distinguished Alumni Awards from the university and Olin, which also honored him with the Dean’s Medal for exceptional dedication and service.




This article was originally published in the 2017 Olin Business Magazine.

Thanks to a generous $1.25 million commitment from The Boeing Company, Olin will continue to provide scholarship support and extracurricular benefits to eligible US military veterans.

“Every day at Boeing, we see the positive impact of the veterans on our teams,” said Shelley Lavender (EMBA ’03), Boeing senior vice president of Strike, Surveillance, and Mobility. “One in seven Boeing employees has served our nation, and brings leadership, commitment, and a unique perspective to the workplace.”

“Our gift to Olin will help ensure today’s veterans have the opportunity to achieve their educational goals and prepare themselves to continue to make an impact in their communities.”

—Shelley Lavender (EMBA ’03), Olin National Council member

Since 2008, Olin has been a full participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program, covering the gap between government funding and Washington University tuition costs for eligible veterans. Boeing’s support of the Olin Veteran Scholarship Fund ensures that Olin can continue to proudly recruit deserving military veterans into its programs.

“The strong leadership qualities that our military veterans bring to the classroom are valued by all Olin students, staff, and faculty,” said Dean Mark Taylor. “The MBA program and qualification give veterans the skills to channel their experience into becoming great business leaders who will change our school, community, and country.”

In addition to veteran scholarships, Boeing will also support the activities of the student-led Olin Veterans Association (OVA), which exists to assist veteran students in their successful transition into the business world. The OVA welcomes veteran students—and their families—to Olin with a three-day “boot camp” that provides an overview of the MBA curriculum. Veteran students are then personally connected to the St. Louis business community through internships, mentor partnerships, employer site visits, and networking events.

On average, Olin enrolls 80 military veterans each year across its graduate degree programs. Olin offers its sincere appreciation to The Boeing Company and its support of military veterans.


Why give back? The reasons are as personal as they are varied. Washington University Alumni & Development interviewed five WashU alumni—including three Olin grads!—to discover why they dedicate finite time, money, and resources to better their alma mater.


Russ Shaw, BSBA ’85

“I think a key reason why I give time to the University is, I had such a positive experience myself. I loved my four years here. The academics were great. The student life was wonderful, and it’s just great, being an alum, to be able to come back and give back to the University.

This is a wonderful institution. It’s a world-leading institution, but it keeps getting better. There is a drive and a vision to keep making it better, stronger, the best academic institution in the world.”

Jeff Rosenkranz, BSBA ’84:

“Education, to Lisa and I, is very important—and not just for our kids, but making sure that everybody has access to education. And that’s a big reason why we support the University, both financially and with our time.”

Lisa Rosenkranz, BSBA ’82:

“I feel like WashU was the launching place for my personal and my professional life. It was the place where I grew up, where I really learned who I was, where I had learned that I could be independent.

My first job in marketing couldn’t have been a better job, and I really credit WashU with giving me that opportunity. I also wouldn’t know Jeff if it hadn’t been for WashU. If I hadn’t gone here, I wouldn’t have the wonderful life I have.”


This Giving Tuesday, we hope you’ll consider a gift to future generations of Olin Business School students. Learn more about ways you can help Olin continue to be a world-class institution for business education.


Howard Wood, BSBA’61, grew up in Bonne Terre, Missouri, a farming community sixty miles from St. Louis. Both of his parents were school teachers and there was no question that he would go to college, but how to pay for it was a major obstacle. “We were as poor as church mice,” Wood says.

“Washington University was just like it is in these days.  It’s a very expensive place to attend given some of the alternatives.  And my first year’s tuition was $750.” That did not include room and board, Wood is quick to add. He will never forget the generosity of one man who made it possible for him to attend WashU.

“We had a gentleman in Bonne Terre by the name of Henry Day who owned a quarry in the county … St. Francois County where I grew up.  And he offered a full scholarship each year to Washington University.  I was on that scholarship as was my brother.  And we were the only two that ever graduated on it.  So it was kind of an unusual situation, but it was a very nice scholarship, and he was a Harvard graduate. But that’s how I got to Washington University; otherwise I would never have been able to attend.”

Wood was considered “an out-of-town student” when the majority of students lived within the metropolitan area and could take the streetcar to school. “There were very few dorm rooms, practically none,” Wood recalls. “The fraternities had most of the rooms for the men.  There was no South 40. They didn’t have sleeping rooms in the sororities.  So it was a little bit different back in 1957.”

Howard Wood had a successful career at Arthur Anderson before partnering with Olin alumnus Jerry Kent to launch Charter Cable. He has been a generous supporter of the Scholars in Business program and talks about the importance of scholarships in another video in this series.

Link to more Olin history on the Centennial website.

 


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