Tag: residency



“When we met with members of the Council of Economic Advisers to the White House, Congressional staffers and Congressional members, it really impressed me that they need  input from industry.” That was one of many takeaways Patti Williams, a member of Olin’s Executive MBA (EMBA) cohort shared after their DC Residency – a deep dive into government regulations and policy – in Washington, DC with Olin partner, the Brookings Institution.

Williams who is Vice President and General Counsel of Peabody Energy completed the EMBA program in May of this year and was featured in a recent article on Olin’s unique DC Residency program published by the Poets & Quants for Executives website.

The four-day DC residency with Olin’s partner the Brookings Institution provides students the opportunity to talk face-to-face with government decision makers including legislators, administrators and power brokers who influence policy behind the scenes. During the residency, students complete two courses: Business and Government, and Business and Society. They engage with speakers from current and former members of Congress to US governors, White House advisors and administrators from organizations such as the Federal Reserve and the Office of Management and Budget.

Olin EMBA graduate, Chris Hawkins, Vice President of operations at Multiply, a St. Louis-based fan engagement platform, says the DC Residency provided an insider’s view of the complexity of the legislative process.

Hawkins told Poets & Quants, the DC Residency was a non-stop learning experience. “There wasn’t any time where you thought, ‘OK, this is where I’m going to step outside and take this call for work.’ You felt like you couldn’t miss anything.”  Hawkins added “It really addressed a hole I had as [business] related to public policy.”

According to Poets & Quants, “One of the biggest takeaways for many…participants was the importance and impact business leaders can have within society as a whole. [Patti Williams] left feeling more optimistic about the interactions between business, society, and government.”

Link to Poets & Quants article, “Olin Mixes Policy and Business in DC”




Three Executive MBA students from Olin’s joint program with Fudan University in Shanghai spent a week in St. Louis this month to attend the EMBA Leadership Residency with students from the St. Louis, Kansas City, and Denver cohorts. Grace Zhou, Class 11, is Head of Reward and Benefits – Asia Pacific at Johnson Matthey in Shanghai; Thomas Cheong, Class 10, Vice President, Asia North Principal International in Hong Kong; and Michelle Cheng, Class 7, HR Business Partner GN Store Nord, based in Ballerup, Denmark.

Executive MBA students are required to attend four week-long “residencies” during their program that focus on different topics. The Leadership Residency – which occurs midway through the program – includes modules on formal and informal leadership.

Shanghai emba in STL

Michelle Cheng visits the Ding, a gift from the EMBA-Shanghai Class 1.

A section on creative thinking enhances your ability to generate strong ideas, the building blocks of innovation, growth, and entrepreneurship. Classmates brainstorm concepts for new companies, products, and services in preparation for an innovation project.

The EMBA program provides one of the most academically comprehensive curricula in the country, with 60 credit hours required for graduation. Courses, themes, and residencies focus on leadership development.

The Executive MBA curriculum includes four required residencies: the GO! Week Residency; the Business of Policy: DC Immersion; the Leadership Residency; and the International Management Residency in Beijing and Shanghai.

 

 

 

CATEGORY: Global



EMBA 45 students in China

Above: EMBA 45 students Jen Barton, Jared Hoover,  and Carson Pollastro watch as Logan Jones and Patrick Smith touch frozen, compressed CO2 harvested from the carbon capture process. 

EMBA students at power plant in China

EMBA 45 students Doug Fluchel and Carson Pollastro in the Shidongkou No. 2 Power Plant turpine room. Photo: Cory Barron

EMBA 45 explored fish markets, tea shops, power plants, and the Shanghai Stock Exchange trading floor during the group’s field study day in China. Eight teams fanned out around Shanghai with the assignment to visit three assigned markets, comparing and contrasting products, packaging, marketing, and store concepts.

Twelve 45s who work in the energy sector enjoyed a special tour of the Shindongkou No. 2 Power Plant north of Shanghai. This plant has a super-efficient carbon capture technology that was of high interest to the EMBAs.

On Saturday morning the teams presented their findings. Then, Lee Konczak led a discussion centered on the EMBAs impressions of business in China. After the morning session, everyone went shopping.

Guest blogger: Cory Barron, Student Services Manager, EMBA team

CATEGORY: Global, Student Life



Olin Business School’s Executive MBA cohort at Washington University in St. Louis recently traveled to Washington, D.C., for a four-day immersion program focused on policy entrepreneurship. The visit was hosted by Brookings Executive Education (BEE).

Sen. Jim talent

Sen. Jim Talent

In addition to a visit with U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay (D-Mo.) and former U.S. Sen. Jim Talent (R-Mo.), the group attended various seminars, welcomed guest lecturers from a variety of government sectors, and visited the White House to meet with the President Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors. The immersion program March 16-19 was designed to to give the cohort firsthand knowledge of how public policy is formulated, and the role it plays in business and enterprise.

“We view the D.C. residency as a unique resource that only the Olin EMBA can provide to students because of our special relationship with the Brookings Institution,” said Lamar Pierce, associate professor of organization and strategy, who accompanied the group on its visit to the nation’s capital.

“For most of our students, non-market forces such as government regulation and interest groups play crucial roles in the strategy and everyday function of their organizations,” Pierce said. “Brookings allows us access to vast expertise of the capital so that we can build better public-private partnerships.”

“In today’s environment, it is more important than ever for business executives to understand the implications policy decisions will have on their business and to know how to interact in the policy process,” said Ian Dubin, associate director of BEE.

EMBAs strike a Secret Service agent post at the Executive Office Building

EMBAs strike a Secret Service agent pose at the Executive Office Building

The four-day immersion was divided into two parts: the first focusing on business and policy formation; the second on business and society, with an emphasis on sustainability and corporate social responsibility.

“We hope the cohort comes away with a better understanding and appreciation both how and why government and industry must work together,” Pierce said. “For managers, it’s crucial to understand why government plays such an important role in markets, and how firms can have a fair and productive voice in regulation and policy.”

Click thumbnails below to view gallery.

Photos by: Daniel Jenkins

Guest Blogger: Erika Ebsworth-Goold, WashU’s The Source




Mei Ye, Senior Advisor, McKinsey & Company.

The theme today for the EMBA 45 class in Shanghai was “China is Big.” China has a big population, big cities, big opportunity. Everything in China is BIG. Class was held on the campus of Fudan University, Olin’s partner school in Shanghai – the second largest city in China with more than 27 million residents.

Mei Ye, a senior advisor at McKinsey & Company, emphasized China’s size as she talked about the country’s newest five year plan. The first leg of the plan is a directive for a healthier China—improvements in air, food, and water. By 2030, Ms. Ye says an additional 800 million Chinese will enter the middle class.

We finished our time at Fudan University with Bee Lan Tan, CEO of Columbia Health-China. She gave a comprehensive overview of the challenges and political structure of China’s Healthcare sector. Ms. Tan says with the demand for better healthcare increasing from the rapidly expanding middle class, healthcare is the sector to be in.

Click photos to expand gallery:

Guest blogger: Cory Barron, Student Services Manager, EMBA team

CATEGORY: Global, Student Life