Tag: Professional MBA



Entrepreneurship

Arch Grants is practically synonymous with the St. Louis startup community. And Ben Burke, MBA’14, director of entrepreneurship at Arch Grants, is at the center of that synergy. He orchestrates many of the connections that fuel the burgeoning startup community here that is attracting entrepreneurs from around the world.

Burke joined Arch Grants in 2013, a year after it was launched as a nonprofit organization dedicated to “building a new economy by providing $50,000 equity-free grants and pro bono support services to entrepreneurs who locate their early-stage businesses in St. Louis.”

Through its competitive Global Startup Competition, Arch Grants attracts innovative entrepreneurs to the St. Louis region with the goal of keeping their startups here to grow a new economy of  innovative companies.

According to its 2016 Annual Report, Arch Grants has awarded $5.2 million in equity free grants to 96 startup businesses in St. Louis that, in turn, have created more than 1,000 jobs in since 2012, and generated over $51 million in economic output for the St. Louis region in 2016 alone. (source: Arch Grants Annual Report.)

Ben Burke is the guest on the latest episode of STL Community Cast, a podcast that created by Drew Davis who talks with innovative leaders in St. Louis. Give it a listen or check it out on Soundcloud.

 

 

 




Women are on the rise at Olin Business School. Five tenure-track female professors join the faculty this fall in the areas of marketing, organizational behavior, and finance. Olin also welcomes a female visiting professor in economics from Carnegie Mellon. And on the student side of the desk, the MBA Class of 2019 is reporting an uptick in the gender category with 39% women.

“We are pleased to welcome so many talented newcomers to the Olin community,” said Vice Dean Todd Milbourn. “We will all benefit from the talent and knowledge they bring to our educational mission.”

Pictured above left to right, front row: Kang, Huang, Hardin; center row: Perfecto, Liao, organizational behavior postdoc; top row: Scott, Ruttan. Photo by Jerry Naunheim.

Ashley Hardin, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavioral

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of Michigan
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, University of Michigan
  • Research Interests: Quantitative Social Research, Quantitative Social Research, Social Psychology

Xing Huang, Assistant Professor of Finance

  • PhD, Economics, 2013, University of California at Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Assistant Professor of Finance, Michigan State University
  • Research Interests: Behavioral Finance, Asset Pricing, Investor Behavior, Market Efficiency, Information Acquisition, Mutual Funds, Household Finance

Karam Kang, Visiting Professor of Economics

  • PhD, Economics, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin:  Assistant Professor of Economics, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Research Interests: Political Economy, Industrial Organization, Environmental Economics

Zhenyu Liao, Postdoc for Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organization, 2017, National University of Singapore
  • Prior to Olin: Research Assistant, National University of Singapore
  • Research Interests: Leadership Behavior and Dynamic, Event Perspective, Interpersonal Interaction

Hannah Perfecto, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Business Administration, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of California, Berkeley
  • Research Interests: Consumer Behavior, Behavioral Decision Theory, Metacognition, Field Experiments, Research Replicability and Reliability

Rachel Ruttan, Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior

  • PhD, Management and Organizations, 2017, Northwestern University
  • Prior to Olin: Instructor, Management and Organizations, Negotiations, Northwestern University
  • Research Interests: Compassion and Prosocial Behavior, Values and Moral Judgment, Emotion

Sydney Scott, Assistant Professor of Marketing

  • PhD, Marketing and Psychology, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Prior to Olin: Teaching Assistant, 2017, University of Pennsylvania
  • Research Interests: Morality and Consumption, Judgment and Decision Making, Preferences for Natural Products

 




To the Washington University community:

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program should be continued and even expanded. With President Trump’s decision to rescind the program and end it within six months, I hope that Congress acts quickly to pass legislation to continue the DACA program so that those registered in the program and others who may be eligible can stay and continue to realize their full potential in this country.

As I have shared directly with our elected leaders, DACA is not only a moral imperative, but it also benefits the United States as a whole. Students who participate in the program have been raised here. They are part of our community, with great potential to make positive contributions to our country. We should be embracing them, not abandoning them.

Because of this decision, hundreds of thousands of young people and their families are scared and worried for their future. Members of Congress can address this and they should. I, and other university leaders, will continue to press elected officials on crafting a permanent solution as soon as possible.

Every Washington University student — regardless of immigration status, race, ethnicity, nationality or any other identity — deserves the same opportunity for academic success.

Here at our university:

  • The Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) is available to aid and assist students impacted by changes in DACA. OISS can provide information about available resources — including housing and legal assistance.
  • We will work directly with students impacted by changes in DACA to address challenges that may make it difficult for them to continue their studies, including financial hardships.
  • The Washington University Police Department’s (WUPD) primary role is to maintain a safe learning environment on our campuses. WUPD does not inquire about immigration status in carrying out their duties. Officers do not detain individuals based solely on their immigration status. Though WUPD is required to comply with lawful subpoenas and other legal requirements, it is not the university’s practice that WUPD will function as an agent of the federal government in the enforcement of federal immigration laws.
  • We zealously protect privacy of confidential student information. We will not release information about a student’s immigration or citizenship status to third parties unless required to do so by law or directive from a court.

You can learn more about available resources here.

Our university draws strength through our differences. We have a long tradition of attracting talented people from all around the world to our community and that will continue. It is on each of us to work to ensure that every member of our community feels welcome, included and empowered to succeed.

Sincerely yours,

Mark S. Wrighton

Image: Flickr Creative Commons Ana Paula Hirama, Statue of Liberty – NYC, Set2011




Hurricane Harvey’s torrential rainstorms and devastation along the Gulf Coast are difficult to comprehend, but it’s clear to see that the people in the flooded region need help. Individuals, nonprofits, and businesses are contributing to the rescue and recovery effort. Chancellor Wrighton’s message to the University community (below) suggests how you can help via the American Red Cross and the Greater Houston Community Foundation.

Mashable posted a long list of companies and what they are doing to help the victims of Harvey. Anheuser-Busch stopped beer production at one of its plants, to fill 50,000 cans with water for Red Cross shelters in areas damaged by the storms.

Link to find out what other companies are doing and how you can contribute to the aid efforts of Apple, Amazon and Whole Foods, Google, Microsoft, Walmart, and major cell carriers to name a few.

Chancellor Wrighton’s message:

To the Washington University community:

Hurricane Harvey continues to deal a devastating blow to eastern Texas and, now, is threatening a broader region. Many of our current students and alumni come from the affected areas; others of us know people who have been impacted or are at risk. They, their families, friends and loved ones are going through a horribly difficult ordeal. Our thoughts remain with them.

The images stemming from this historic natural disaster are heartbreaking. At the same time, the stories of herculean rescue efforts and people coming together to help one another are heartwarming. Here at Washington University, our community is built on the foundation of care and support we extend to each other and to others, particularly in times of crisis. This is one of those times and I know many of you are looking for ways to lend a helping hand. If you would like to donate to response and recovery efforts, following are two of the many organizations requiring resources. Every contribution — no matter the size — can make a difference.

American Red Cross
Greater Houston Community Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

If you or someone you know is experiencing personal difficulties in dealing with the aftermath of this tragedy, I hope you will take advantage of the counseling resources available for students through Student Health Services on the Danforth Campus and Student & Occupational Health Services on the Medical Campus, and for our faculty and staff through our Employee Assistance Program.

Many are predicting that Hurricane Harvey could become the worst flooding disaster in U.S. history. People are hurting and the recovery will take a long time. Please remain vigilant for the long haul and do what you can to help.

Sincerely yours,

Mark S. Wrighton




Last weekend was PMBA GO! As a newly-minted member of PMBA 44, I discovered I had a lot to learn.

I work in Olin’s Marketing & Communications Department, behind-the-scenes of Olin’s social media presence and the blog and website. Luckily, I work for a university that is very supportive of staff continuing their education. Even luckier, I work at one of the top-ranked business schools in the country.

Enrolling in the Professional MBA program was intimidating, but thrilling. Having conquered GO! Weekend, I have a better idea of what I hope to get out of the program, and where I am now.

My framing and conceptualization of problems is narrow

This was a surprising discovery for me, but I suppose that was the point of reading hours’ worth of case studies. The benefit of participating in class discussion about cases is that you become aware of holes in your logic. Some of the potential solutions (or issues) my peers were raising simply did not occur to me, and vice versa.

As a cohort we spent a lot of time learning about problem formulation and its importance in critical thinking. The more we improve at problem formulation—arguably the most important step in critical thinking, since a great solution to the wrong problem is still the wrong solution—the better we become at taking a step back and looking at the situation from a new perspective.

  

It’s okay that I don’t have a background rooted in finance and statistics

My educational background is in journalism, and the bulk of my business experience is in marketing. To say that I was a little hesitant about diving into an MBA program with some of the region’s up-and-coming business leaders is an understatement. But I also knew that Olin has positioned itself as a safe environment for industry- and career-changers.

I have a lot to learn when it comes to quantitative decision making, statistics, and accounting…or operational management, strategic management, and economics. Really, I just have a lot to learn. There is a steep learning curve for me, but it seems much more manageable than I feared it would be. Plus, I bring other skills to the table that can be as valuable in pitching someone on an idea or getting buy-in. Prof. Tarek Ghani said the cohort, like any other MBA group, could be split into categories of “poets” and “quants.” I am very much in the “poets” category.

Yes, GO! Weekend is pretty intense

Don’t let the pics of team building fool you! GO! Weekend is a lot of work. The main component of the PMBA program that can make the workload seem so daunting is the fact that nearly all of the students are employed full-time. We weren’t gently eased into case studies and writing recommendations—we were told to drink from the fire hose immediately. I never imagined myself spending the amount of time I spent calculating, analyzing, and writing a 300 word recommendation. It’s difficult, but the challenge is also exciting.

Teams are organized for diversity—and it is very beneficial

I’m on a core team of four, and we come from different backgrounds: chemical engineering, operations, finance, and marketing. The diversity of experiences and thought has already been helpful to broaden my thinking toward certain cases and the way I approach them. The PMBA program does this intentionally, because everyone can learn from how things are done in other industries, and differing skillsets complement each other. But the entire class has a richness of perspectives and ideas to share, which really augments lectures and class discussion.

I’m looking forward—with excitement but also a little anxiety—to the coming months. I feel like I’ve already experienced an evolution in my thinking (although I certainly have a ways to go), and it has been three days! Where will I be at the end of these three years?


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