Tag: internships



Part of a series about summer internships from Olin MBA ’20 students. Today we hear from Ian Belkin, who worked with MUTE International in Shanghai.

I spent my summer interning at a startup in Shanghai named MUTE International. MUTE is an acronym for Multiple Urban Transport Evolution. The company provides green, energy efficient, electric scooters to consumers, eschewing ownership in favor of month-to-month usership.

The business model is similar to the WeWork or Cort models, but functions in the transportation space through an app that provides a streamlined and frictionless set-up, requiring no down payment or credit card.

My role as an intern has comprised creating cashflow and other financial projections of expected growth as well as constructing pitch decks to court potential investors in future rounds of funding.

One fear inevitably shared by participants in internships with such truncated timelines is that the challenges and responsibilities conferred upon them will be rote and lack significance. Fortunately, my personal experience at MUTE has been quite the opposite.

There exists a plethora of substantive, engaging and challenging assignments to be tackled. Since its inception, MUTE has been aggressively expanding into nascent markets and now boasts offices across three continents, in locations as diverse as London, Bali, Shanghai, Perth, and Lyon.

A large portion of my early efforts were spent investigating the financial viability of three additional proposed outlets in Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur and Ho Chi Minh City (to my great disappointment, I was not invited to participate in the on-the-ground due diligence in any of these exotic locales).

Accounting for the nuances associated with breaching new markets is an interdisciplinary exercise: marketing and scaling bleed into operations and logistics, all of which are framed and constrained by the vagaries and realities of financing.

This internship experience has provided ample opportunity to develop and meld the various core tenets of business espoused in the first year of our Olin MBA program.

Inevitably, start-ups succeed based on the unbridled passion and proclivity towards masochism of their founding members. MUTE is the brainchild of Patrick Davin, an intrepid and indefatigable Aussie with 25 years of experience in the electric scooter market and a successful IPO already to his credit.

Beyond the evolution of my technical skills, bearing consistent witness to Patrick’s inimitable enthusiasm and perseverance were the most valuable commodity I left with. Leadership, another often-touched upon trope within Olin is not only preached, but practiced on a daily basis at MUTE.

I feel fortunate to have earned the opportunity to learn directly from Patrick, and hope to impart my newly acquired wisdom upon my return to Olin and upon all future endeavors thereafter.




Part of a series about summer internships from Olin MBA ’20 students. Today we hear from Fifunmi Ogunmola, who worked at United States Tennis Association as a finance intern.

How I prepared for my interview/landed the internship

Over the summer, I was a finance intern at the United States Tennis Association. I had applied for corporate finance intern roles on LinkedIn, MBA Focus and other job boards and then, I received a call from a director at the USTA as part of a pre-interview screening. I eventually interviewed with a senior finance director, who became my manager.

I prepared for the interview with resources from the Weston Career Center. I had mock interviews with some of my peers. Also, I had access to resources to help me prepare for finance-specific interview questions.

How I used what I’ve learned at Olin during my internship

With multiple team projects and club activities in our first year, we learned collaboration. This proved useful during my internship. I had to work with my teammates, other interns and staff in other departments.

In addition, learning critical and strategic thinking in my classes helped me put my summer project in perspective; the model I was developing was not just to solve a department’s problem, but to provide a solution with nationwide impact.

How the internship prepared me for my final year at business school

Prior to the internship, I asked my manager in an email how to prepare for the internship. He asked me to come with an open mind. I saw the relevance of that advice multiple times during the internship. Beyond learning new technical and managerial skills, I learned so much about an unfamiliar industry.

As I begin my final year of business school, I intend to have an open mind; to explore more opportunities to connect and to embrace learning in all forms.

A day in the life

9:00 a.m.: Workday officially begins.

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.: Check emails; check-in with manager on revisions to the 2020 budget presentation; check-in with teammates; complete pending tasks.

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.: Intern check-in with the New York office.

10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Work on tasks for the day; attend meetings (with teammates, other departments, work mentor etc.).

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.: Lunch and learn (professional development sessions over lunch).

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.: Complete tasks for the day; work on summer project or other projects.

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.: Intern project meeting.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Work continues.

5:00 p.m.: Already?! Tomorrow is another day!

How the internship is shaping my long-term career goals

The projects I worked on during the internship further revealed my career interests in finance and data analytics. This has guided my selection of classes and my decision to take complementary courses on LinkedIn Learning.

In addition, some of the lunch and learn sessions I attended taught practical skills on corporate communication, networking with senior executives and building a personal brand, all important elements of career success.

I believe that as I continue to gain the academic knowledge required to achieve my career goals, and as I build upon these specific skills learned during my internship, I am on the path to an enriching career.




Part of a series about summer internships from Olin MBA ’20 students. Today we hear from Abraham Kola-Amodu, who worked at AT&T as a finance intern.

I spent 13 weeks of the summer as a finance leadership development program intern at AT&T corporation. Before landing this opportunity, I harnessed available resources within and outside of Olin. I attended conferences, browsed company websites, job search websites and finally, the now disengaged MBA Focus.

The latter was where I’d found the job posting, as AT&T has some partnership with Olin Business School. I applied and was invited to perform a personality test online, which led me to the next stage.

Before my first interview, I recalled that the last interview I’d had was over a month prior. I knew I was rusty and not smooth, so I engaged Jeff Stockton, a career coach with the Weston Career Center, who gave me a solid prep one hour before my interview. The rest is news.

My work at AT&T, even though it was in finance, entails a lot of project and team management. Luckily, a lot of team activities, people, time and project management skills were taught in the first year, and that was what helped me the most in the period of my internship.

For the remainder of business school, I intend to brush up more on some aspects of finance, because there were some topics that I saw a few other interns discuss and I was totally blank on. This is not to say there were no topics I knew that were alien to them also.

My typical day at work is very unlike many others. I spend about three to four hours a day on meetings. Why? Because my role is heavily strategy based and by reason of that, I must meet with different teams on what to do next, appraise what was done and decide how to make improvements to the existing ideas and concepts we have.

Another hour or so of my day is spent networking—coffee chats or meet-and-greets with the top-level management company officials. Also, in many instances, an hour is spent on events or programs organized specifically for the interns, which ranges from volunteer activities to trainings and happy hour. The remainder of the day is my “me time” to do my actual work.

The finance leadership development program is geared at getting MBAs to lead the company, which is why it is structured in a way that we always meet with the executives. Networking is very vital in climbing the corporate ladder here at AT&T, thereby helping me get set of achieving my C-suite goal.




Part of a series about summer internships from Olin MBA ’20 students. Today we hear from Felicia Kola-Amodu who worked at T-Mobile as a retail organizational and human strategy intern.

How I prepared for my interview and landed the internship

A few months before school started, I knew a few of the companies I wanted to apply to and T-Mobile, where I ended up interning, was one of them. Therefore, I started researching early. I researched the company, I looked at hundreds of interview questions on Glassdoor, spoke with a highly-qualified friend at length and did mock interviews with him as well.

How I’m using what I’ve learned at Olin during my internship

One of the most profound things I have re-learned at Olin is the power of being myself and building genuine relationships. These were things I knew before Olin, but being in such a business environment and among very knowledgeable people can be daunting.

But by the end of my first year at Olin, I had learned how to be more comfortable in my own skin, be very affirmative while open-minded and to think bigger than what I can see or feel at that moment. I also learned a few “power plays” in Peter Boumgarden’s Power & Politics, that were very useful during my interactions with different people in different positions.

I did not think I learned a lot in Critical Communication, but there were a few things that helped me formulate my ideas and thought patterns better, that I know I learned during Cathy Dunkin’s CritiComm.

How the internship is preparing me for my final year at business school

In the last year, I have mostly worked with students, done school work, and have generally been away from a professional environment. This summer, working on real time, real life projects opened my mind a lot more before. I have learned to be more open minded.

Something I did not think I would learn is building better slide decks and it is safe to say I am now a “slide deck buff.” I am learning to see setbacks as learning curves, not just complete failures that usually wear me down. Lastly, I am understanding the meaning and art of connecting and networking with people.

A day in the life

Interestingly, my days varied a lot. I would either walk in and just get down to a new project or something I had been previously working on. Other days, I walked in with zero clarity or expectations of what I would be working on that day, while on some days I walked in and it was one call or meeting to another and me trying to stay awake all through.

How the internship is shaping my long-term career goals

Something I have been thinking about for a while is how to connect my communications and journalism background and degrees with my MBA, I realize now through a chat with T-Mobile’s EVP for communications and community engagement, that it is more than possible.

Also, a look into the different teams, work streams and people here have expanded my mind to see beyond the traditional MBA career paths. Lastly, “doing good by doing well” is a phrase I latched on to, listening to Ambassador Symington last semester, during his visit to Olin.

I have seen people live this everyday at T-Mobile and it has greatly reshaped the way I think about my long-term goals.




Part of a series about summer internships from Olin MBA ’20 students. Today we hear from Atiyana Evelyn, who worked at Capital Group as a summer marketing associate.

This summer I worked in Los Angeles at Capital Group doing marketing in their North America distribution department. When looking for internships, I never thought I would end up in the financial services industry.

As someone whose background is heavily marketing, with a brand focus, it was definitely a shift in gears. When preparing for my interview, I researched a lot about the company and what they did within that industry.

In addition to that, I looked at their products and tried to understand them as much as I could prior to going to LA to interview in person. During my interview, I actually said verbatim “I’m not going to lie, I don’t know anything about finance, but I know a lot about marketing and I am willing to learn.”

Honestly, Olin prepared me immensely for my internship this summer. It allowed me to have the skill set to jump into the learning curve quickly and become acclimated to my new environment.

For my specific role, I didn’t have to know too much about the financial services industry, but I have learned so much and am excited to apply what I’ve learned to my real life experiences.

I think one of the most valuable things about summer internships is being able to find your place. You have the opportunities to figure out what you want to do with your life and the direction you want to take it into.

I have loved marketing since I was 15 and I am glad to know that this is something I still want to pursue, regardless of the industry that I am in placed in. I am glad that Olin has provided me with the opportunities that I have participated in and I am excited to see what the future holds.