Tag: EMBA 47



Students in EMBA Class 47 spent their Leadership Residency week in St. Louis meeting with top execs in different fields to discuss current business issues across a wide range of topics.  Human resources was the topic of a panel discussion that included guests from leading companies. Vikki Schiff, Vice President of Human Resources for Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Carra Simmons, Vice President of Learning and Development at State Farm, Ray Kleeman, Vice President of Human Resources at Monsanto, and Wendy Livingston, Vice President of Talent & Leadership at Boeing participated in the evening dialogue, sharing their extensive knowledge of HR with the EMBA 47 cohort.

Wendy Livingston answers a student question as part of the EMBA Leadership Development Panel.

Wendy Livingston answers a student question as part of the EMBA Leadership Development Panel.

The panel was convened to bring real world solutions into the academic setting, and the student questions reflected the students’ immediate learning. One student posed the question based on an earlier classroom discussion, “How do we acquire and keep talent when the talent pool is shrinking?”

Livingston answered, “Be O.K. with people leaving, but on good enough terms that they want to come back later.”

Students also wanted to know to what these executives attribute their personal growth.

Carra Simmons

Carra Simmons

Simmons said, “throw me in a snake pit!” She believes that learning how to problem-solve has made the most impact on her personal growth.

Ray Kleeman

Ray Kleeman

Kleeman replied, “take a risk and bet on yourself, have a good network, and know your worth on the market.”

Livingston’s comments included “never saying no to a job. This makes people you work with very grateful. Know your worth. Know the business.” Then she commented on when mentoring, male mentors will talk about business and female mentors will talk about being aggressive or pursuing dreams. “I can watch TED talks for that!”

Vikki Schiff

Vikki Schiff

Some companies are using data analytics to determine potential leaders internally. Others are utilizing new self and departmental evaluations. Once a potential leader is determined, each company has its own method for developing their leaders, and these methods are continually being updated and challenged as the workforce changes.

Olin is grateful for friends like these who are willing to share their time and expertise to further our mission to create knowledge, inspire individuals, and transform business.

 




Olin Business School’s Executive MBA cohort at Washington University in St. Louis recently traveled to Washington, D.C., for a four-day immersion program focused on policy entrepreneurship. The visit was hosted by Brookings Executive Education (BEE).

Sen. Jim talent

Sen. Jim Talent

In addition to a visit with U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay (D-Mo.) and former U.S. Sen. Jim Talent (R-Mo.), the group attended various seminars, welcomed guest lecturers from a variety of government sectors, and visited the White House to meet with the President Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors. The immersion program March 16-19 was designed to to give the cohort firsthand knowledge of how public policy is formulated, and the role it plays in business and enterprise.

“We view the D.C. residency as a unique resource that only the Olin EMBA can provide to students because of our special relationship with the Brookings Institution,” said Lamar Pierce, associate professor of organization and strategy, who accompanied the group on its visit to the nation’s capital.

“For most of our students, non-market forces such as government regulation and interest groups play crucial roles in the strategy and everyday function of their organizations,” Pierce said. “Brookings allows us access to vast expertise of the capital so that we can build better public-private partnerships.”

“In today’s environment, it is more important than ever for business executives to understand the implications policy decisions will have on their business and to know how to interact in the policy process,” said Ian Dubin, associate director of BEE.

EMBAs strike a Secret Service agent post at the Executive Office Building

EMBAs strike a Secret Service agent pose at the Executive Office Building

The four-day immersion was divided into two parts: the first focusing on business and policy formation; the second on business and society, with an emphasis on sustainability and corporate social responsibility.

“We hope the cohort comes away with a better understanding and appreciation both how and why government and industry must work together,” Pierce said. “For managers, it’s crucial to understand why government plays such an important role in markets, and how firms can have a fair and productive voice in regulation and policy.”

Click thumbnails below to view gallery.

Photos by: Daniel Jenkins

Guest Blogger: Erika Ebsworth-Goold, WashU’s The Source


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