Tag: corporate relations



Students in EMBA Class 47 spent their Leadership Residency week in St. Louis meeting with top execs in different fields to discuss current business issues across a wide range of topics.  Human resources was the topic of a panel discussion that included guests from leading companies. Vikki Schiff, Vice President of Human Resources for Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Carra Simmons, Vice President of Learning and Development at State Farm, Ray Kleeman, Vice President of Human Resources at Monsanto, and Wendy Livingston, Vice President of Talent & Leadership at Boeing participated in the evening dialogue, sharing their extensive knowledge of HR with the EMBA 47 cohort.

Wendy Livingston answers a student question as part of the EMBA Leadership Development Panel.

Wendy Livingston answers a student question as part of the EMBA Leadership Development Panel.

The panel was convened to bring real world solutions into the academic setting, and the student questions reflected the students’ immediate learning. One student posed the question based on an earlier classroom discussion, “How do we acquire and keep talent when the talent pool is shrinking?”

Livingston answered, “Be O.K. with people leaving, but on good enough terms that they want to come back later.”

Students also wanted to know to what these executives attribute their personal growth.

Carra Simmons

Carra Simmons

Simmons said, “throw me in a snake pit!” She believes that learning how to problem-solve has made the most impact on her personal growth.

Ray Kleeman

Ray Kleeman

Kleeman replied, “take a risk and bet on yourself, have a good network, and know your worth on the market.”

Livingston’s comments included “never saying no to a job. This makes people you work with very grateful. Know your worth. Know the business.” Then she commented on when mentoring, male mentors will talk about business and female mentors will talk about being aggressive or pursuing dreams. “I can watch TED talks for that!”

Vikki Schiff

Vikki Schiff

Some companies are using data analytics to determine potential leaders internally. Others are utilizing new self and departmental evaluations. Once a potential leader is determined, each company has its own method for developing their leaders, and these methods are continually being updated and challenged as the workforce changes.

Olin is grateful for friends like these who are willing to share their time and expertise to further our mission to create knowledge, inspire individuals, and transform business.

 

CATEGORY: Career, News



www.barlowpro.com

Kathy Button Bell

Kathy Button Bell connected with Emerson in 1999 after being president of her own company, Button Brand Development, a marketing consulting firm. She was executive director of worldwide marketing communications for North Andover, MA-based Converse Inc. and director of advertising and public relations for Wilson Sporting Goods Co., in Chicago.

Among other things, Button Bell has been a wonderful contributor in the classroom, judged multiple times, and has been part of the success of Olin’s Women’s Leadership Forum. Through these efforts and more, she exemplifies what it means to be a Friend of Olin. Friends are those who are giving of their time, their knowledge, share their years of experience, and who open the doors of their companies to students and faculty to help Olin build better leaders.

Some friendly questions for Friends of Olin:

What has been one of your most valuable experiences at Olin Business School? 

I have really enjoyed my experience with the Women’s Leadership Forum. Faculty members, such as Hillary Sale and Michelle Duguid, regularly share the latest and greatest on leadership research while the Forum provides opportunity for women to tap the great advice from our community’s business leaders. The access to and partnership with these female leaders has been outstanding.

What is the most compelling thing your mentor has done for you?

David Farr, Emerson’s CEO, has always been an unflinching supporter of our most progressive marketing efforts. He has placed an enormous amount of trust in our marketing teams, offering all of us ‘creative runway’. His willingness to push marketing boundaries inspires us to constantly seek ways to make Emerson more unique and modern.

What are the 3 biggest challenges facing leaders today?

• Short-term focus of the market
• Global / political instability
• The modern work environment. In the last several years, workplace dynamics have changed dramatically. Companies are expected to develop meaningful relationships with their employees like never before. This pressures internal communication to be more transparent and in tune to employees’ needs.

What is the one behavior or trait you have seen impede leaders’ careers?

Personal insulation. The easiest way to fall behind is to get trapped in your own bubble.

Tell us about a pivotal moment in your career.

Joining Emerson. Coming from a consumer marketing background, the industrial world was an underdeveloped environment. It has been fun to introduce sound and color to a company in the BtoB space. Most gratifying of all is helping to accelerate change in an established, successful culture.

What are you grateful for today? Why?

A happy, healthy child (in college). Better than any other accomplishment, I’m grateful to have raised an independent young man.

Who’s your favorite business speaker or author? Why?

Keith Yamashita, the founder and chairman of SYPartners. He wrote the book on corporate anniversaries, and his ideas completely turned around my perspective on corporate milestones. He took the notion of a moment in time and turned it into a deep meaningful lesson on corporate ethos and growth.




Three top information technology experts – all Olin alumni – recently hosted more than 30 CEOs and CFOs at the Knight Center to discuss the future of IT and break down some of its mysteries for non-tech executives.

The expert alumni-in-residence for the day included:

  • Joe Blomker, EMBA’90, CEO & President, Maryville Technologies
  • Jerry Kent, BSBA’78 & MBA 1979, Chairman & CEO, TierPoint
  • Don Imholz, MS IT’79 & EMBA’91, retired EVP & CIO, Centene Corporation; currently  leading Don Imholz and Associates

IMG_3579 (002)All three alumni shared their insights on how to prepare for the future.

“Technology legacy is sunk costs,” according to Blomker.  “Legacy is currently consuming approximately 70% of IT resources to maintain functionality vs. investing in innovation and the future.”

Imholz remarked that organizations today need to be more flexible and ready to adapt to the changing landscape of both the future of IT in their organization as well as the talent that is providing the support for the newer technologies.

IMG_3578Afterward, John Herber, Chairman, Rubin Brown, who was in attendance, said it was great to get this group together to engage in this kind of dialogue. It is so important, he said, that we think about costs and its impact related to IT needs in the future.

This was the first in a series of conversations that Blomker, Kent, and Imholz plan to hold with executives interested in the role of information technology in business today.




RBC mentor panel

At the St. Louis Regional Business Council’s (RBC) Spring Reception for the Mentor Network Program, a panel of RBC Mentors shared sage advice with students.

RBC mentor network logoKathy Osborn, Executive Director of the RBC, advised the audience to “find a company with a mission you can get behind.”

Debbie Rub, Vice President & General Manager at Boeing, shared Boeing’s vision for the future as the company celebrates its 100th year. “Human flight is the future,” Rub declared.

The panel moderator was John Stupp, President of Stupp Bros. He kicked off the discussion by asking, “What lessons have you learned along the way?” Below are a few of the candid insights panelists provided:

Tom Manenti, Chairman and CEO, MiTek Industries:

  • Show up on time (which Manenti said is actually 15 minutes early).
  • Have organization skills.
  • Have an open mind.

Wendy Henry, Managing Partner, BKD:

  • Love what you do. Be passionate.
  • Nurture and develop relationships.
  • Learn your business, not just your job. Understand how it operates.

Tony Thompson, Chairman and CEO, Kwame Building Group:

  • Don’t accumulate too many enemies at one time.
  • Empathy in a leader is important.
  • Inspect what you expect if you want respect.

Dan Gillian, Vice President, F/A-18 & EA-18 Programs, Boeing Military Aircraft

  • Know your business and do your job first.
  • Believe in the power of yes. Take risks.
  • Manage your luck. Put yourself in the right positions.
  • Be intentional and not prescriptive.

Additional insight and advice from panelists to come!

About the RBC Mentor Network. Every academic year, each of the 14 schools of business and engineering in the Collaboration recommends students, based on academic performance and interest in the St. Louis business community, to participate in the RBC Mentor Network. These students are then individually paired with a CEO or top executive of an RBC company to receive practical, “real world” knowledge and post-graduate opportunities.




Proof that dreams can come true: One day before the TEDxGatewayArch: DREAM of Major League Soccer (MLS) event hosted by Olin convened, news broke that St. Louis business and sports leaders are joining forces to bring an MLS expansion franchise to our city. (more…)

CATEGORY: News