Tag: Building Olin



Pictured above: Earvin “Magic” Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers point guard for 13 seasons, stands with WashU students and staff at the Lakers practice facility in El Segundo, CA, on Monday, March 12, 2018. This was totally unexpected, and Magic couldn’t have been any nicer or more gracious. Michael Weisman, Taylor Cohen, Bryant Powell, Dr. Patrick Rishe, Issac Kaufer, Allan Bekerman, Magic Johnson, Kelly Minster, Teresa Iadevito, Katie Sissler, Oscar Vasco, and Konnie Henning.
Bryant Powell, MBA '19, during the 2018 "minor in the business of sports" immersion trip to Los Angeles.

Bryant Powell, MBA ’19, during the 2018
“minor in the business of sports”
immersion trip to Los Angeles.

Eight Olin students recently returned from a whirlwind trip to Los Angeles for the annual “sports trek,” part of WashU’s minor in the business of sports program.

In addition to bumping into major sports celebrities like former Los Angeles Lakers starter Magic Johnson, the students joined Olin Senior Lecturer Pat Rishe for an intensive four-day immersion into numerous aspects of sports business—from venue management and talent representation to sports marketing. Students visited companies such as Fox Sports, Wasserman sports marketing, the CAA talent agency, the AEG sports and entertainment presenter, the NFL Network, and more.

The students returned March 12. We asked for their perspectives on the trip. Taylor Cohen, BSBA ’20, shared a video she put together looking back at the experience. Bryant Powell, MBA ’19, and Michael Weisman, BSBA ’20, responded to several questions about the trip (see below).

What drew you to the sports business trek to L.A.?

“One of the most profound things that drew me to the LA trek was the power and influence of the companies and people we were visiting,” Powell said. “Just having an hour to speak with and network with the true power players in the sports industry was a pleasure and honor to be a part of.”

Students on the 2018 sports trek at an L.A. Clippers game.

Students on the 2018 sports trek at an L.A. Clippers game.

Weisman said he’s been a lifelong sports fanatic, so when the invitation to apply for the immersion trip came from the Weston Career Center, he quickly abandoned his plans to return home for spring break.

“I never thought that I would necessarily have a career in the sports industry, but my dream has always been to work for the New York Yankees,” he said. “After convincing my parents to let me apply, I went through the process and got accepted to the program. Still not knowing exactly what to expect, I was ready to take Los Angeles head on.”

Powell said he was also drawn to the immersion experience. “While our days were very busy, meeting many individuals and companies, the ability to have our nights free to truly immerse yourself in the city of Los Angeles—its culture, attitude, and atmosphere—was just as valuable an experience as the day’s events.”

What surprised you about the trip?

Powell was most surprised by the openness of the firms. “They gave us access, advice and guidance about what we wanted to do in our careers,” he said. “From Evan at Exit 39 describing his vision in the future of content to Gabe at Wasserman, with advice on how to make it as an intern at his firm. They welcomed the chance to learn more about us, give advice, and were completely open-minded for students to help them on consulting projects that they felt the talent at WashU could provide.”

After a lifetime of devotion to professional baseball, basketball, football, and college sports, Weisman was surprised to learn how far off the court, off the field, and off the diamond the sports business industry extended.

“From the expansion of MLS to media to agencies, my eyes were opened wider than I ever expected,” he said. “Also, I was surprised to learn that there are infinite paths to enter the sports industry. It was an interesting anomaly that the industry is so small, yet not one person took the same path to get to where they are today. One person was a mascot for a minor league baseball team and used that as his ‘in’ to the industry.”

What were your three most important takeaways?

Powell kept his takeaways very simple: The power of networking and creating lasting relationships; always hustle for opportunities you are passionate about; and data, data, data.

Weisman was a bit more expansive. “I realized that the reality and behind-the-scenes experience within the industry is not exactly the same outside view,” he said. “There is a tremendous amount of work and collaboration between sub-sectors required to create this experience for the outside world.”

Passion, he said, was evident among the people he and the other students met during the four-day visit. “If you show your passion, people will recognize it and want to help you pursue it,” he said. “The main takeaway is to never settle and keep striving towards your dream job.”

What do you wish you’d known before you went? Any advice for students on the next trek?

Powell said he wished he had known more about the e-sports segment of the industry. “After touring Riot Games, I gained a whole new understanding and respect of the sport and its presence in popular culture and its business potential,” he said.

“If I’d were to give advice for students on the next trek, I would first tell them to leave yourself open for all opportunities that this industry has to offer,” Powell said. “You might walk in wanting to be a general manager of a baseball team, but end up loving the chance to be a sport agent.”

Weisman echoed Powell’s point. “It is important to keep an open mind. You will definitely learn something you didn’t know before,” he said. “The CEO of Oak View Group, Tim Leiweke, could say something so influential that you end up changing your career goal.”

Plus, Powell said, L.A. is a pretty cool place to visit. “Traveling to Santa Monica, Venice, Malibu, Inglewood, or Hollywood just makes you feel like you’re a part of the city so you can really get a chance to see if this is the right place for you.

How do you see this trek influencing your career decisions going forward?

“Before coming to get my MBA at Olin, I was in the sports, media, and entertainment industry,” Powell said. Now, he’s committed to gaining the analytical, marketing, and project management consulting background to re-enter the industry better equipped. “Taking this trek to L.A., where the industry basically lives, was an ideal opportunity for me.”

Weisman is also heavily interested in learning more about data and analysis: “I am unsure if my career goals or major/minor combination will change due to this trip, but it definitely has me thinking and expanding my options.”

Pictured above: Earvin “Magic” Johnson, Los Angeles Lakers point guard for 13 seasons, stands with WashU students and staff at the Lakers practice facility in El Segundo, CA, on Monday, March 12, 2018. Said Rishe: “This was totally unexpected, and Magic couldn’t have been any nicer or more gracious.” Visitors with Magic include Michael Weisman, Taylor Cohen, Bryant Powell, Rishe, Issac Kaufer, Allan Bekerman, Magic Johnson, Kelly Minster, Teresa Iadevito, Katie Sissler, Oscar Vasco, and Konnie Henning.




Sharon Mazimba, MBA ’19, submitted Yield Lab content; Allison Halpern, BSBA ’18, edited and formatted this CEL blog post.

Many CEL Practicum students have the opportunity to travel internationally to understand business on a global scale. In contrast, The Yield Lab team has a unique experience to work with a local company headquartered in St. Louis that has global impact.

Part of this will include traveling to Dublin to see Yield Lab’s agriculture technology processes in action. The Yield Lab is a family of agricultural technology venture capital funds and accelerators that invest in innovative companies with the potential to sustainably increase food production globally.

“I’m interested in learning more about venture capital and how funds are managed and differ internationally. This is a great opportunity because of The Yield Lab’s international presence. I’m very happy to learn the venture capital structure specifically in Argentina and Ireland.” –Carola De La Torre Cuba

With the support from investors and experienced individuals who nurture startups in the agriculture industry, Yield Lab has recognized tremendous opportunity for growth globally. Since its inception, Yield Lab’s global reach has expanded quickly with additional funds established in Ireland and Argentina. As Yield Lab continues to expand its brand to various regions, an efficient and connected global management structure is vital.

Here’s Where CEL Comes In

The Yield Lab has engaged the Center for Experiential Learning team to address the challenges inherent in the current structure and explore the dynamics of Yield Lab’s expansion plans.

“The content around agricultural technology, venture capital, and how both of these work together is what interests me. I hope to enhance my leadership techniques and also learn from the team—especially with their unique skills and backgrounds.” –Sharon Mazimba

With the support of Washington University in St. Louis, the CEL Practicum team aims to provide The Yield Lab with a recommendation that will facilitate its goal of furthering global reach in agricultural technology venture capital funds and accelerators. The team will focus on developing a scalable structure as new locations join under the Yield Lab umbrella, thus helping the Yield Lab brand grow.

Leading The Yield Lab team is Sharon Mazimba, MBA ’19. Sharon will serve as the project manager and main point of contact between the team and the client. The rest of the team—Carola De La Torre Cuba, MBA ’19; Rohan Kamalia, MBA ’18; Ashiq Cherian, SMP ’18; and Meredith Owen, MBA ’19—will serve as strategists to ground all recommendations in data.

“There is so much I want to learn from The Yield Lab and I’m excited to work with knowledgeable teammates. I believe learning does not only happen in the classroom, but is exemplified with experiential projects. Looking forward to learning more about teammates—their talents and specific interests.” –Rohan Kamalia

This team blends diverse cultural backgrounds stemming from Zambia, Peru, India, and the United States with an array of professional experience from doctoral level academia to strong finance and technology backgrounds. The strategic selection of The Yield Lab team exemplifies the breadth and depth of experience and values that the CEL and Olin Business School bring to our partner consulting companies. Each team member is coming in with his or her own purpose and sense of enthusiasm. Get to know the team a bit more here and learn more about their unique passions to create impact for the client.

“I’m excited to work with students in the MBA program, because I feel they bring a vast array of experience. Looking forward to exploring the details of how funds are managed internally and diving into the deal flow structure.” –Ashiq Cherian

“Traveling to Ireland and being able to travel internationally alongside my team is a huge plus! I am also fascinated by agricultural technology and the startup space. Excited to network in the agricultural technology space and create a valuable and meaningful solution for our client.” –Meredith Owen

Stay tuned to hear how their trip goes and how in-person meetings help students deliver impact in part two.




Toyin Umesiri

Chioma Ukeje and Sharon Mazimba, MBA 2019, contributed this post on behalf of the Olin Africa Business Club.

Where can existing business leaders and Olin business students find a market of 1.1 billion people? Or a market that demands innovation in sustainable and affordable agriculture, support for a burgeoning middle class, and action to build new supply chains?

The Olin Africa Business Club will explore answers to these questions and more in its first ever Olin African Business Forum, scheduled for March 30. The morning and early afternoon event includes speakers such as Toyin Umesiri, CEO of Nazaru; Mark Taylor, dean of Olin Business School; Rob Dunlop, regional business director for Monsanto; Anne Toba, CEO and founder of Ripples Foundation; and Ade Osibamiro, Project Manager and consultant for Mastercard.

“Olin Africa Business Club is positioned to elevate and expose Africa’s potential to current and future business leaders,” said OABC President Ony Mgbeahurike, MBA 2019. “This event is a key step in that direction.”

Toyin Umesiri, our keynote speaker for the event, has previously worked in various leadership positions at Walmart is passionate about bridging the gap between companies here and businesses in Africa. She will center her talk around opportunities and the potential the continent has to play a major role in the business world.

We asked Toyin some of her thoughts on key questions relevant to the forum.

What do American leaders need to know about Africa that they do not know?

Africa is a continent whose history is rooted in commerce and not different from other parts of the world like India, Latin America and China. Africa has 1.1 billion people, a quarter of the number of countries in the world, and is home to some of the fastest growing economies.

By 2050, the population of Africa is projected to double and become one of the world’s largest youth workforces. There is a functioning and business side to Africa with a growing middle class on the rise to claim global significance in years to come.

To support this, there are a growing number of leaders working to develop sustainable and affordable food solutions, inclusive health, create new supply chains and build the infrastructure to support seamless movement of goods and services across the continent. With manufacturing steadily shifting from China to Africa, business leaders can no longer ignore Africa.

America leaders will need to develop an effective strategy towards Africa if they want to engage in the market positioned for rapid economic growth in the future.

What do students need to know about Africa and the opportunities there?

We have all read the stories and seen the images depicting Africa has a region of war, famine and diseases. What is missing from the narrative on Africa are the stories that capture the aspirations of Africans: Their triumphs and quest to build successful businesses with global relevance.

The future of Africa is being created by innovators, change agents, entrepreneurs, and global business leaders working hard every day to build solutions that will power Africa’s growing economy.

Technology advancement on the continent of Africa is driving the creation of disruptive solutions and we must develop future leaders who would see and understand where the “world” is going and not only where it has been so that they can help create the future.

What opportunities exist for business leaders in Africa?

Africa offers new markets for US-made products. Similarly, the United States serves as an untapped market for authentic African products—raw and manufactured. For leaders interested in export and import, sustainable agriculture, supply chain, and logistics, they need to start thinking about expanding into Africa.


The Olin Africa Business forum is scheduled for March 30, 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Emerson Auditorium. In addition to Toyin’s talk, two panels are scheduled—one on agriculture technology and a second on leadership—featuring industry experts from companies such as Monsanto and Mastercard.

This forum promises to be exciting, informative, and will highlight the wealth of opportunities on the continent. Click here to get your tickets here now.




With our student consulting projects underway, we wanted to highlight the Center for Experiential Learning teams’ international footprint. This semester, 95 students are packing their bags to travel to five different continents through the CEL Practicum and Global Management Studies program.

From Ecuador to Uganda and India to Madagascar, there is Olin representation all over the globe. But what are these teams doing and how are they delivering business results to various clients?

Some teams are working with nonprofits to combat systemic issues in these regions. A healthcare consultant from Missouri, a software engineer and change maker from India, a globetrotting businessman from Vermont, and a combat medic from California are coming together to consult for a nonprofit in Africa.

The team is collaborating with Mavuno, an organization working to end extreme poverty in eastern Congo by developing “GOs,” or grassroots organizations. Part of their project is analyzing the demand of potential business ventures in Congo. Being on the ground will provide students with a better perspective of the culture, people, and business environment to pose actionable recommendations.

One team is working with a brewery to audit and understand the operations and financials of the company. In doing so, they will learn the inner workings of beer manufacturing and how the process differs from the United States to Germany. Coming from St. Louis, the team will have local knowledge to build upon.

While it is great to create international impact, many teams have the opportunity to consult with a client with operations that extend from St. Louis and abroad. These teams, including The Yield Lab and Missouri Botanical Gardens, will be able to see how local contributions can create impact for a global environment.

Beyond consulting with a singular client, the Global Management Studies teams are getting to dive right into other cultures and experience businesses through tours and travel. Two GMS trips are happening this semester – Japan and Colombia.

These students are taking on the role of being Olin ambassadors by building relationships with business executives and planning company visits. They have been planning for this through a class this past semester and will get to see it all come into fruition now.

So, whether you are passionate about supporting causes abroad or understanding business from an international lens, CEL has a place for you. We are excited to build student interest and global experiences to create business-learning opportunities. Stop into the CEL Hub (Simon 100) to see what programs, clients, or trips could align with your interests.




OWIB

Julie Kellman, MBA ‘19, an officer with Olin Women in Business, wrote this post on behalf of the organization.

This semester, Olin Women in Business launched the Men As Allies initiative, an exciting expansion that invites men in the Olin community to join OWIB through an official membership track. I was honored to lead the kickoff event in January and I credit the Olin community with making my role that evening easy. The enthusiasm and willingness to listen, learn, and engage was contagious.

The kickoff drew a full house, with attendance reaching 20 percent of current Olin MBA students. OWIB members and officers led discussions to bring together women and men from the community to share experiences and discuss the state of gender equity at Olin and in the business community at large.

The initiative includes events focused on gender equity, action steps to combat unconscious bias, and a weekly newsletter to encourage ongoing engagement. Allies events are designed with two objectives in mind: to open lines of dialogue and create action steps.

We focus on two-way conversations in small groups to impart the often unspoken details of our experiences, whether as a woman in business or as an ally with good intentions. With open dialogue, we can navigate unfamiliar terrain together. Our primary goal is to build common ground and expose unconscious biases that are held by both men and women alike.

Beginnings of the Initiative

Last fall, OWIB recognized anecdotal interest in creating a community partnership with men on campus. Men in the Olin community approached OWIB seeking to learn ways to combat gender disparities in business. Together, we’ve launched the Men As Allies initiative to provide a clear path for engagement and everyone is welcome.

Our first step was to verify the interest through survey data, which showed a desire for small group discussions in which to digest gender equity in current events and share concrete steps to support women in our community and beyond.

At OWIB, our goal is to provide tools and a structured partnership between men and women to enable Olin members to fight for gender equity together. We need to normalize conversations of inclusion and gender equity in order to achieve meaningful cultural change.

What is an ally? An ally is someone who takes active steps to advocate for a group that is not their own. That can take many forms; I encourage you to explore what being an ally means to you and what steps you are comfortable and able to take. This is not a one-size-fits-all process and self-reflection is key.

Joining a Wider Movement

Right now is a great cultural moment for allies! We’re joining a movement. Olin Allies is partnering with MBA Allies, a coalition of student-initiated male-allyship groups at top business programs across the country.

Further, industry-leading firms such as McKinsey and Goldman Sachs have put their money where their mouth is and invested heavily in gender equity programs. For any ally, the annual McKinsey Women in the Workplace report is a great place to start (and a quick read!)

Since the kickoff, OWIB has introduced a weekly newsletter to encourage ongoing conversation. Each week, OWIB Allies sends an article on gender equity as it relates to the Olin community. Each topic is less than a seven-minute read—less time than the Starbucks line—to engage the community in consistent dialogue. (To subscribe, please contact OWIB through Campus Groups or email me at Jkellman@wustl.edu.)

As our new group gains momentum, we’re looking for more ways to engage the entire Olin community, involve faculty and staff, and update the curriculum to reflect the student body. Keep an eye out for future Men As Allies events on topics such as the business case for investing in women and topical forums for supporting inclusion in the workplace. Our next event is a screening of the movie Battle of the Sexes and discussion cohosted with Net Impact on March 20 from 3:30–6:00 p.m. in Hillman 230.

We are striving for a culture shift and we need all hands on deck to achieve that. I encourage you to continue this dialogue, both formally through the OWIB Men As Allies initiative and organically in your day to day life. The most fundamental action steps we can each take is to normalize conversations on gender equity, ask questions, and consistently cultivate an inclusive, intersectional mindset. At OWIB, we’re thrilled to provide a campus forum for gender equity allies to come together and amplify this crucial conversation.




Written for the Olin Blog on behalf of Bear Studios by Lexi Jackson, BSBA’20.

Young professionals today are far less likely to be drawn to monetary incentives than past generations. As PwC finds, millennials are driven by feedback, fulfillment, and the potential to create impact. They desire to make a difference in their work and reach high levels of social impact.

As I consider my own career ambitions, I find that they align most closely with this idea. I want to use my career as another platform to affect change and create my livelihood from difference-making.

The hardest question to answer is, where do I begin?

In order to begin a journey toward high impact, an individual has to have a healthy degree of impatience. That is to say, the most impactful individuals do not wait until they are at the most ideal state in their lives to make an impact. They act immediately with the resources they have at the time. Most individuals will never feel fully ready or equipped to believe they have the capacity to make real impact, and, therefore, often do not act.

Don’t Wait to Act

What we forget is that our actions are only as strong as our passions, and our passions cannot be cultivated by resources or opportunity—they exist in us inherently. Those who have the passion to create change are those who know that change can’t wait. And neither can their action.

Perhaps this is why I decided to create Olin Business School’s first Diversity and Inclusion Summit on February 9. I recognized a need within the community for dialogue and action on this topic, and while I didn’t have the personal resources to materialize my passion, I knew that by seeking the proper partners, the event could come to fruition. All it took was my decision to begin action.

Lexi Jackson

My team and I planned the Summit for more than five months. We booked speakers from over seven companies and organizations including Uber, Facebook, US Bank, Build-A-Bear, and more. We sought financial assistance of more than five different student organizations before finding success from our central sponsor, the BSBA office. We overcame challenges, celebrated unexpected opportunities, and crafted an event that attracted more than 80 students, faculty, and community members.

At its inception, the summit appeared to be an impossible undertaking. We did not have the resources, brand, or experience to execute a half-day event. However, if we had waited until we felt completely assured of our ability to succeed, we would likely have never succeeded altogether.

Action Leads to Fulfillment

Young professionals must act with the same diligence if they desire to find fulfillment in every stage of their career. I hear all too often that my peers are accepting jobs that do not fully excite them, simply to serve as an intermediary between now and their dream career. However, that does not have to be the case. High impact jobs can be found at every point on the career track and include jobs that are both meaningful AND lucrative. A high-impact job does not have to mean working at a nonprofit or earning lower wages in the pursuit of a greater good.

This understanding is the exact mission of the organization 80,000 Hours. 80,000 Hours was created by two Oxford researchers and philosophers who found that this generation is driven by high impact through a career, but will too often forfeit these positions of change in fear of financial stability.

Therefore, 80,000 Hours serves as a job search platform where users can find positions that produce high levels of social impact without breaking the bank. The jobs are sorted into a plethora of categories and are designed to teach users about the breadth of social impact. For example, with artificial intelligence positioned at the threshold to the future, there is perhaps no higher impact job that one can hold than to research and understand both its dangers and benefits. In this way, users are able to find surprisingly impactful positions that fulfill their interests and leverage their expertise.

As a member of Bear Studios, a student-run strategy firm and LLC, I actively use the resources and knowledge that I can contribute at the time to add value to our clients’ projects. I may not have all the answers, but that does not mean I should not leverage what I do know to make the biggest impact that I can.

When we begin to measure social impact in a different way, we find ourselves more equipped to act. We find ourselves more fulfilled, more involved, more empowered. We find ourselves making a difference. Most importantly, we find ourselves refusing to wait. And that, is where the change happens.

Pictured above: Charlyn Moss (BSBA’20), Lexi Jackson (BSBA’20), Sema Dibooglu (BSBA’20), Claudia Rivera (BSBA’20)

Guest Blogger: Lexi Jackson, BSBA’20, is majoring in leadership and strategic management, political science; she is a strategy fellow at Bear Studios LLC.


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