Tag: automation

SAN JOSE, CALIF.  – The Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) today bestowed the fifth annual AdvaMed Lifetime Achievement Award to former Beckman Coulter CEO and Chairman John P. “Jack” Wareham, for his contributions to improving patient care and health care system efficiency through innovation of clinical laboratory testing.

Jack Wareham

“Jack is one of the unsung heroes of modern medical practice,” said Scott Whitaker, president and CEO of AdvaMed. “His work at Beckman Coulter helped pioneer automation in the clinical laboratory and transformed the diagnostic industry as a result. Millions of people every year benefit from his vision of more accurate and efficient clinical testing, and we are honored to present Jack this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award.”Wareham began his career in the life sciences after earning a bachelor’s of science degree in pharmacy from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He worked as a pharmacist while earning an MBA from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and worked his way through the ranks of the pharmaceutical company, Smith, Kline and French.

SmithKline acquired laboratory instruments company Beckman Instruments in 1981 in a $1 billion deal. Beginning in 1984, Wareham held several senior management positions in the new division. In 1993, he was named president and COO of Beckman Instruments, which was spun off as a separate, public company in 1989.

As COO, he was the driving force behind the successful merger in 1997 of Beckman Instruments with Coulter Corporation, the leading manufacturer of systems for blood and other cell analysis. In 1998, he was named CEO of the newly formed Beckman Coulter.

Today Beckman Coulter is recognized as a powerhouse in the diagnostics industry, developing and marketing instruments, chemistries, software and supplies to simplify and automate laboratory operations, and ultimately save patient’s lives.

After retiring from Beckman Coulter in 2005, Wareham has continued to share his vision and business expertise, helping to guide a number of diverse enterprises as a director for medtech companies including Steris, ResMed, Accuray and Greatbatch

Wareham also served as chairman of the Board for AdvaMed in 2000, helping lead the association in a new direction for the 21st Century as it rebranded from the Health Industry Manufacturer’s Association.

“I am proud to be honored by my peers with this incredible award,” said Wareham, “and I gratefully accept on behalf of all the wonderful people I’ve worked with over the years who are dedicated to improving patient care.”

AdvaMed’s Lifetime Achievement Award highlights the accomplishments of pioneers in the medical technology sector whose contributions have had a significant impact on patients’ lives and the industry as an essential part of America’s economy. The award was presented during The MedTech Conference powered by AdvaMed at the San Jose Convention Center.

AdvaMed member companies produce the medical devices, diagnostic products and health information systems that are transforming health care through earlier disease detection, less invasive procedures and more effective treatments. AdvaMed members range from the largest to the smallest medical technology innovators and companies.


Automation, or the use of robots and other artificial intelligence to perform tasks, has increased dramatically over the past couple decades. And while a Skynet scenario in the near future is unlikely, we are undoubtedly on the brink of an automation revolution.

John Stroup, President & CEO of Belden Inc., recently paid a visit to The Boeing Center to discuss some of the economic drivers for a revolution in automation. He believes that the United States is well-positioned for increased automation in manufacturing due to recent technological advances. In fact, the majority of manufacturing jobs lost in the last 10-15 years are a result of increased automation, not offshoring (as is commonly thought).

One of the economic factors Stroup credits for the automation revolution is the rise in minimum wages. As labor costs increase, companies look for ways to decrease spending, often turning to machines to replace their human counterparts. But despite the downward trend in manufacturing jobs, there has been a massive uptick in productivity due to robotics and other technology. He predicts that by 2025, the global average of tasks performed by robots will be around 25%, more than double what it is today. Stroup then went on to describe his experience at a “lights-out factory,” or a factory that doesn’t turn on the lights because it utilizes only robots and artificial intelligence.

Stroup went on to mention that Europe is often ahead of the curve in terms of automation due to relatively expensive labor. Regardless of one’s opinions about automation, we are likely to see its increased adoption as global labor costs rise and the cost of implementing AI falls.

For more supply chain digital content and cutting-edge research, check us out on the socials [@theboeingcenter] and our website [olin.wustl.edu/bcsci]

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A Boeing Center digital production

The Boeing Center

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Technology is changing the landscape of supply chain at a breakneck pace, and organizations that are able to stay ahead of the curve often enjoy a significant advantage over their industry competitors. Digitization, cloud computing, big data, Internet of Things, and artificial intelligence are all major factors in shaping operational strategy. These manufacturing innovations have given rise to a trend dubbed Industry 4.0.

John Stroup, President and CEO of Belden Inc., paid a visit to The Boeing Center to share his wealth of knowledge, and to give a brief history of Industry 4.0, aka the Smart Factory. He explained that Industry 4.0, a term coined in Germany, is the fourth major iteration in manufacturing processes. “‘Smart Manufacturing,’ ‘Intelligent Factory,’ and ‘Factory of the Future’ all describe an intelligent, flexible, and dynamic production facility, where machinery and equipment will have the ability to improve processes through self-optimization and autonomous decision-making,” said Stroup. The major improvements from 3.0 to 4.0 are the ability to automate complex tasks (even remotely) and the access to data across the whole supply chain that allows for greater flexibility and connectivity.

Stroup went on to discuss the key characteristics of the Smart Factory and how innovations in digital technology have improved existing business models and enabled new ones. Such innovative technology allows for improved productivity, flexibility, and decision making, all of which benefit manufacturers and consumers alike.

For more supply chain digital content and cutting-edge research, check us out on the socials [@theboeingcenter] and our website [olin.wustl.edu/bcsci]

• • •

A Boeing Center digital production

BCSCI

Supply Chain // Operational Excellence // Risk Management

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