Alum: Learn to manage emotions during job hunt, so they don’t manage you
Lauren Herring

People who lost their jobs during the pandemic and are looking for work might find this new book helpful: “Take Control of Your Job Search! 10 Emotions You Must Master to Land the Job” (Simply Good Press, July 2020).

A successful job search is about much more than a resume, says author Lauren Herring, MBA ’07. It’s an emotional process, and how you manage your feelings will influence your search, she says.

Herring is the CEO of IMPACT Group, a global career development company. In her book, she examines 10 emotions that affect job seekers and provides guidance on how to master them for clarity and control.

“The emotional toll of joblessness has probably never been higher as our career and financial concerns are now combined with life-and-death health concerns,” said Herring, who lives in St. Louis. With increased unemployment, competition for jobs “creates tremendous fear for people.”

“Since so many people don’t have the luxury of working one-on-one with a career coach, I decided to write this book,” she said.

The book is in three parts: Emotions of loss, which are grief/sadness, anger and fear; emotions that paralyze, which are denial, frustration, anxiety and loneliness; and emotions that move you forward, which are self-compassion, confidence and excitement.

Network, network, network

The best way to land a job is through networking, Herring pointed out. Leveraging your network will also help minimize one of the primary sources of frustration in a job search, which is applying online and not hearing anything back.

“Spending 40 hours a week searching the job boards is counter-productive in a job search. It’s not particularly effective, and it can lead to loneliness and increase anxiety.”

Herring says that to reduce anxiety about networking, think of it as “reconnecting” with old friends or colleagues. Because of social distancing, some people may feel limited in their ability to network.

“But it’s really nothing more than reaching out in an authentic manner to let people know your job search goals and also to offer help with anything they might need as well.”

Create a ‘Super Team’

Herring says it’s critical to have a network of support while searching for a job. She suggests creating a “Super Team” much like a personal board of advisers.

“You’ll want professional contacts who know your industry or field, as well as leaders you respect who can share their perspective on your approach to the market, give feedback on your resume and even help you with mock interviews,” she said.

You’ll also want friends or family or possibly a faith leader who can help lift your spirits when you’re down and remind you of all your great qualities, she says.

“Now more than ever, having the confidence to stand out, be proactive in your search and connect with your network through nontraditional means, such as Zoom, will deliver results.”

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